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Former halifax tour boat Liana’s Ransom in trouble, crew rescued


Coast Guard search and rescue crews from Station Gloucester, Air Station Cape Cod and the Coast Guard Cutter Ocracoke rescued nine crewmembers from the Canadian tall ship Liana’s Ransom 58 miles east of Gloucester, Monday. 
Watchstanders at the Sector Boston Command Center received notification at 12:35 a.m. that the vessel’s engines were disabled and its sails were wrapped around the mast.  
As the weather deteriorated, and seas reached nearly 10 feet, Sector Boston launched two 47-foot motor lifeboat crews from Station Gloucester to tow the vessel back to Gloucester. Once on scene, the boat crews connected the tow, but the rough sea conditions caused the tow line to break. 
The motor lifeboats crews directed the crew of Liana’s Ransom to don immersion suits and to prepare to abandon ship about 30 miles east of Gloucester and a Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk Helicopter from Air Station Cape Cod was diverted to assist. 
The nine passengers were transferred from Liana’s Ransom to the Coast Guard motor lifeboats. One man suffered a head injury when leaping from Liana’s Ransom and was airlifted to Massachusetts General Hospital by the Jayhawk helicopter crew.
The Station Gloucester crews returned to the station with the eight remaining crewmembers. A locator beacon was left on Liana’s Ransom for tracking and the Coast Guard Cutter Ocracoke is en-route to evaluate towing the vessel to port. 
“It was fortunate for the crew of the vessel that the owner reached out to us,” said Jay Woodhead, the command duty officer at Sector Boston’s Command Center. He said with winds gusting to 30 knots, it was unsafe for them to stay aboard.
Liana’s Ransom has had a rough few months. In December, she was demasted off cape sable island while attempting to sail to St. Kitts. She is also rumored to have grounded in the sand in Eastern Passage during her last visit to Halifax.
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AC624 – Normal vs Not Normal.

By now, we have all seen and heard the stories about the landing of AC624, A Toronto to Halifax flight with a A320 Aircraft. This route and aircraft land in Halifax dozens of times per week. Saturday night, this one came up short.

Runway 05/23 is the main runway at YHZ. runway 05 is a quick landing, as after you exit the runway, you end up at the terminal. this runway was extended in 2012, and may have reduced the impact of this crash.

The MK airlines crash, the Same ILS Antenna was taken out, however then it was on a berm. the space between the berm and the end of the runway was filled in as part of the Extension.
note the Alignment of Runway 05 and taxiway J in 2007:

And now, on the Current Chart.

(Below) the aircraft sits on the runway. the ILS Localizer lays broken on the left at the end of the runway.

Compare that with the normal Approach below. Note the plane is also an Air Canada A320. Also note that windsock above.

Here is the touchdown. Rear wheels are down, and the nose is coming down. Note the windsock. AC624 came to rest right where it should have touched down.

How Low was the plane? Here is the crater it left in the snow, and on the left the remains of the ILS Localizer. also note the snapped off lead light in the foreground. thats an 8 foot fence.

These are the leading lights in advance of the broken one. Note the height difference.  This flight was luckey. The aircraft clipped powerlines, but somehow managed to miss the wooden telephone poles. also the large dent in the snow probably cushioned the impact, as the recent snowfalls were still relatively fluffy compared to the earth mound.

Below an AC flight landing. this is landing on runway 23. Note the clearance over the localizer

Parts of the Landing Gear lie among parts of the localizer, and the right side of the runway.

Thanks to ADS-B, You can watch a replay of the flight Here

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More Ferry Builds for A.F. Theriault and Sons

A.F. Theriault and Sons Ltd., in Meteghan River, Digby Co., has been awarded the contract to build the new Digby Neck ferry.

The new ferry will replace the 20-year-old Joe Casey. The Joe Casey will be used as a spare ferry for provincial operations. The ferry will be about 35 metres long and 13 metres wide, accommodating 18 cars with additional seating for 10 passengers.

The government has a fleet of nine ferries operating around the province. Delivery of the new ferry is expected to be late next year.

The Joe Casey (Left) was also built by A.F. Theriault and Sons. the Joe Casey provides service to Brier Island and carries over 30,000 vehicles and 75,000 passengers per year.

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Aussie Immigrant – Svitzer Wombi Arrives in Halifax.

The tug Svitzer Wombi made port today. Svitzer recently purchased 3 Chinese tugs in May 2014 for use in Australia, though word was one was sent north to be used in Point Cartier PQ at the Cargill grain Facility there.

After Purchase, The tug went through a work period in Singapore, and was then delivered to Panama, where the Dutch firm  TOS was responsible for crewing the delivery voyage to Halifax.

On her arrival today, the Aussie Name was very small, and the Letters Svitzer Cartier could be seen under the blue paint, Suggesting that will be her name. weld marks for Svitzer  Wombi could also bee seen under the paint.

She was built in 2006 by the San Lin Shipyard as Hai Gang 107 and was flagged in Shang Hai China. She is equipped with 2 x Voith-Schneider drives. I expect she will hang out at ECTUG until registered in Canada.

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Atlantic Navigator – Quick stop at Fairview Cove

The Atlantic RO-RO lines vessel Atlantic Navigator made a brief stop this morning at the west pier of Fairview Cove. She tied up around 9am, arriving from Immington UK, and sailed at 11 for Baltimore.

She was built in Germany in 1992, and is owned by Baltic Mercur of Russia. She is currently runs between the Baltic and the North American east coasts. Outfited with Cranes, and a RO-RO Ramp, she is a versatile vessel.

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Lois M and Barge Nunavut Spirit.

The Mckeil tug Lois M arrived over the weekend with the Barge Nunavut Spirit.
The tug has been working with the Hebron offshore project, and is likely here to pick up parts from Cherubini in Dartmouth.

The Tug was Built in Japan in 1991 as Lambert, and was Acquired in 2013. She is built to the same basic design as Beverly M1, Another tug acquired by Mckeil a year before, and a 2 time visitor to Halifax.

The barge Nunavut Spirit was built in Portland Oregon in 1983 as a single hull tank barge, but was converted to a flat top in 2008. she is 116m long and 32m wide, and is also owned by Mckeil.

Both Tug and Barge are registered in St. John’s Newfoundland.

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Dartmouth CG Base Sold.

 Finance minister just announced that Waterfront Development has purchased the Dartmouth Coast Guard Base as the location for an Ocean Technology Hub.

Update: Here is the Press Release
The former Canadian Coast Guard land on the Dartmouth waterfront will be home to an ocean innovation centre.

The Waterfront Development Corporation has received approval from the provincial government to purchase the land from the federal government.

The corporation will now work with the provincial government, industry and post-secondary schools to develop the centre, where ocean technology research and private sector marine businesses can work together to drive more investment, commercialization, exports and growth.

The annual global market value for ocean-related goods and services is $3 trillion.

“Nova Scotia is home to some of the world’s best ocean technology companies,” said Jim Hanlon, CEO of the Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise. “Providing this new facility as a space for collaboration and waterfront testing will allow those companies to more effectively innovate and compete globally.

“Having this as shared space brings even more value to industry and to the students who will create the next generation of ocean industries.”

More than 200 companies make up Nova Scotia’s ocean science and technology sector. Activity includes science, fisheries, aquaculture, offshore oil and gas, shipbuilding and maritime security.

“The ocean is our competitive advantage,” said Economic and Rural Development and Tourism Minister Michel Samson. “Acquiring the land is a once-in-a-generation opportunity, preserving a key site that will create new markets and opportunities for people in Nova Scotia’s marine and ocean-related sectors.”

Located at 27 Parker St., the property includes buildings, waterfront and over 850 metres of wharf and two 100 metre piers.

The property is a 9.5-acre site plus water lot. The purchase price is $6.5 million.

“Waterfront property holds great strategic value for the province and our economy,” said Colin MacLean, president and CEO, Waterfront Development Corporation. “This purchase creates an exciting opportunity to cluster ocean technology companies with Nova Scotia’s world-class marine research programs, enabling direct ocean access to support their work.”

An ocean innovation action team is in place to guide the vision and strategic direction for the ocean innovation centre.

The centre supports OneNS goals linked to business startups, exports from growth-oriented companies, and research and development partnerships.

Nova Scotia is recognized internationally for ocean research done by Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia Community College, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Royal Canadian Navy, and a growing sector of export oriented ocean technology companies.

The Canadian Coast Guard now operates from the Bedford Institute of Oceanography.

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CCGS Terry Fox

With the recent stream of Newfoundland based coast guard vessels, its not a huge surprise that the CCGS Terry Fox put into port today just after 5:30. She was also here last march for bunkers and supplies, and will likely do the same before sailing back into the gulf for ice breaking Duties.

CCGS Cape Roger, an Offshore Patrol Boat based in Newfoundland also spent some time at BIO last week.

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