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2/3 of HMCS Harry DeWolf to roll out

today and tomorrow, the mid and stern superblocks are scheduled to be rolled out. The Middle is to be done first, and it already placed on the transporters. The Stern will follow.

The bow superblock sub assemblies were constructed in Woodside, and have been delivered to the yard to be assembled into the third superblock. Additional work will continue in the yard. It also appears that a Tower crane is being installed on Pier 8 to facilitate this work.

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Quay Construction for AOPS at Dockyard

I had a question about the work taking place at Pier 9. McNally construction currently is building a new Quay to serve as a Home base for the new AOPS vessels under construction at Halifax Shipyards. The dredging work was completed over the winter, and they are now pouring the blocks that make of the Quay.

The blocks are individually slipformed on a semi-submersible barge, then floated off when complete, towed to their final location and sunk into position. the blocks are hollow, and will be filled with rock, and the whole area will then be backfilled, and paved over.

A completed block, tied up at Pier 9

A new block, just underway.

The whole process hasen’t changed much in close to 100 years – this is the same method used to construct the Ocean Terminals almost 100 years ago

One Final Note: Why is it a Quay?

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Second AOPS Has A name.

The Goverment Announced the first AOPS would be named Harry Dewolf. They have now announced the second will be Named HMCS Margaret Brooke.

Margaret Brooke was aboard the SS Caribou when it was torpedoed off the coast of Newfoundland on Oct. 13, 1942.  Her Actions earned her the Order of the British Empire.

Brooke was born in Ardath, a village located approximately 70 kilometres southwest of Saskatoon.
She enlisted in the Second World War on March 9, 1942, as a “nursing sister/dietician.” She was eventually promoted to the rank of lieutenant-commander. She was a passenger on the SS Caribou Oct. 13, 1942, as it attempted to cross the Cabot Strait off the coast of Newfoundland.
The ship was hunted and torpedoed by the German submarine U-69, according to government records. It took only five minutes for the Caribou to sink.

After the war, Brooke returned to her studies at the University of Saskatchewan. She earned a doctorate in paleontology and went on to author several major research studies in her field. She Turned 100 this past Saturday, and was visited at her home in Victoria By Commodore Bob Auchterlonie, Commander Canadian Fleet Pacific, who delivered the news.

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Ships Starting Here AOPS Contract Signed.

  In a technical briefing with media in Ottawa Friday morning, representatives from Public Works Government Services Canada, the Canadian Navy and Irving Shipbuilding provided an overview of the Arctic Offshore Patrol ship program including the ship’s design and capability, the number of ships to be built and the construction schedule.

The Shipyards contract with the government is for six ships. The build contract is valued at $2.3 billion. Should costs increase due to unforeseen factors, the contract will guarantee the delivery of five ships within the same ceiling price ($2.3 billion). Basically the contract is for 5, but if they come in at a good price, they will build 6.

Construction of the first sections of the vessels – known as initial blocks or production test modules – will begin in June. The shipyard will test its new infrastructure, environment and production processes, with these initial blocks. Cutting of steel for the first AOPS ship is on target for September 2015.

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AOPS Has A name

The Government today announced the name of the first of the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS). Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Harry DeWolf, named in honour of a wartime Canadian naval hero, will be the first of a fleet of AOPS designed to better enable the RCN to exercise sovereignty in Canadian waters, including in the Arctic. The Prime Minister made the announcement at His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida, formerly commanded by Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf, which currently serves as a museum ship and is located on the waterfront of Hamilton, Ontario.

Subsequent ships in the class will be named to honour other prominent Canadians who served with the highest distinction and conspicuous gallantry in the service of their country. The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships Class will henceforth be known as the Harry DeWolf Class, with Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Harry DeWolf as the lead ship.

A native of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf (RCN) was decorated for outstanding service throughout his naval career, which included wartime command of His Majesty’s Canadian Ship St. Laurent from 1939-40, for which he was twice the subject of a Mention in Dispatches (a national honour bestowed for distinguished service). Later, his 1943-44 command of His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida helped that ship gain the reputation as “Fightingest Ship in the RCN,” participated in the sinking of 14 enemy ships, and for which he was again twice the subject of a Mention in Dispatches and awarded both the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Service Cross. A consummate leader both ashore and afloat, his exceptional wartime service was recognized with an appointment as a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and as an Officer of the U.S. Legion of Merit. He was also awarded the Canadian Forces Decoration, soon after its creation, to recognize his good conduct throughout his career. He went on to become a popular and effective postwar Chief of the Naval Staff from 1956 until 1960. 

For the first time in its 104-year history, the RCN will name a class of ships after a prominent Canadian naval figure. Vessels have traditionally been named for cities, rivers and Native tribes.
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Contracts Signed for Final AOPS Design

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women, along with the Honourable Peter MacKay, Minister of National Defence, and the Honourable Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay, Associate Minister of National Defence, today welcomed the signing of the definition contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships project through the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) at an announcement at halifax Shipyards.

This is the next contract signed after the ancillary one announced in July 2012 and it will be followed by a construction contract in 2015. This definition contract is a task-based contract divided into seven work packages (or tasks) that could be awarded. With this contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. will refine and complete the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design to production level prior to construction in 2015. The total potential value of the contract is an estimated $288 million and it will support up to 200 jobs.

Once completed, the definition contract will enable Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to know exactly what to build and how to build it. It will ensure that once the build contract is signed, construction of the ships will begin.  At the same time, work will begin on improving and upgrading the Irving Shipyard to begin full ship construction in 2015.

During the initial discussions regarding the Navy’s Arctic/Offshore patrol ships, Canada and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. agreed that the first contract should be a smaller preliminary contract, followed by a larger definition contract to complete the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design to production level, and subsequently an implementation contract to build and deliver the ships.

This “design-then-build” approach will mitigate both technical and cost risks by reducing unknowns, and therefore risks, for the building phase. Once completed, the definition contract will enable Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to know exactly what to build and how to build it. It will ensure that once the build contract is signed, construction of the ships will begin immediately. This approach is also aligned with the NSPS, which is built upon a more collaborative and risk-sharing relationship.

On July 10, 2012, the Government announced the awarding of a $9.3-million (HST included) preliminary contract to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. Within this preliminary contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. reviewed the existing Canadian-developed Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design and specifications, prepared an execution strategy and delivered a proposal detailing the scope and cost of the subsequent definition contract.

Finally, on March 7, a definition contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. was signed. The total potential value of the contract is an estimated $288 million (taxes included). The definition contract is a task-based contract divided into seven work packages (or tasks) that could be awarded. The first two tasks have been authorized and their total value is approximately $136 million.
The definition contract will last 30 months and we are on track to start cutting steel in 2015.
The Arctic/Offshore patrol ships will be used by National Defence to conduct armed seaborne surveillance in Canada’s economic exclusion zone, including in the Arctic.

The definition contract signed with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. is a task-based contract divided into the following seven work packages (or tasks) that could be awarded. With this contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. will refine and complete the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design to production level prior to construction in 2015.

  1. Project Management – This task will include all work required to ensure effective planning, management, execution, monitoring and control, and reporting of the definition contract work.
  2. Engineering Design Phase 1 – This task will include the system engineering activities, integrated logistical support analysis and supplier engagement activities that are necessary to demonstrate that the preliminary Arctic/Offshore patrol ship design meets all of the contract design specification requirements with acceptable risk and within the cost and schedule constraints.
  3. Engineering Design Phase 2 – This task will include the system engineering activities, integrated logistical support analysis and supplier engagement activities that are necessary to demonstrate that the Arctic/Offshore patrol ship design is a complete and integrated solution that meets all the contract design specification requirements with acceptable risk and within the cost and schedule constraints.
  4. Engineering Design Phase 3 – This task will include the system engineering activities, integrated logistic support analysis and supplier engagement activities that are necessary to demonstrate that the Arctic/Offshore patrol ship design is a complete and integrated solution that meets all of the contract design specification requirements and is ready for the start of vessel construction.
  5. Project Implementation Proposal Development – This task will encompass all the procurement, engineering, production and estimating activities required to develop the detailed project implementation proposal, including the required plans and a substantive cost for the implementation contract.
  6. Test Production Module – This task will include all the work required to establish and verify production processes and produce a test module prior to beginning vessel construction.
  7. Long Lead Items Procurement – This task will encompass all of the procurement and supply chain activities required to procure long lead items, which must be purchased prior to the start of vessel construction.

Once completed, the definition contract will enable Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to know exactly what to build and how to build it. It will ensure that once the build contract is signed, construction of the ships will begin.

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