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Coast Guard looks for interim Icebreakers and towing Vessels

From the RFI:
Due to age and reduced availability of the icebreaking fleet, the Coast Guard anticipates that it may require additional icebreaking capacity provided by one (1) to five (5) Icebreakers (Heavy, Medium, or Light) at various times over the next number of years. Accordingly, the CCG must investigate potential bridging strategies to address potential
gaps in service.
The Icebreaking capable vessels that are approaching the limit of their notional operational life and undergoing Vessel Life Extensions (VLEs) to keep them in service until replacement vessels can be built and delivered via the National Shipbuilding Strategy. The VLEs are scheduled to take place from 2017 until 2023, with up to three (3) vessels undergoing repairs each year. While efforts are being made to minimize work that would occur during an icebreaking season, the VLE work will remove some vessels from service for a significant period of time.
The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) currently has two (2) Heavy Ice Breakers (HI), four (4) Medium Icebreakers (MI), and nine (9) Multi-Task Light Icebreakers in its inventory. The Coast Guard deploys these vessels in Canada’s Arctic waters during the late-Juneto mid-November period (the Arctic season), and South of 60oLatitude from the December to May period (the Southern season). The vessels are based in Quebec City, Quebec; Dartmouth, Nova Scotia; Victoria, British Columbia and Argentia and St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador.
The Coast Guard is also looking at commercial towing options for standby tugs. the John 1 Incident (we covered that tow well) was specifically mentioned as a case where this service would have been beneficial. It looks like the government is looking to buy the services of an existing company.
Given the number of out of work offshore supply vessels – some of which are ice class, there should be some interesting responses.
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Leeway Odyssey – reincarnated.

The Leeway Odyssey arrived this morning and tied up at the Museum Wharves. She is the reincarnation of the CCGS Louis M. Lauzier.

Leeway Odyssey was built in 1976 by Breton Industry Ltd.of Port Hawkesbury as  Fisheries patrol vessel Cape Harrison. In 1983, she was converted to a survey vessel and renamed CCGS Louis M. Lauzier. She was finally laid up in 1995. In 1998 she was chartered to MUN, until 2005, when she was converted back to a Patrol Vessel in Burlington Ontario, to be crewed by the RCMP and CCGS. After the Conversion, she was assigned to the Quebec region. to patrol the St Lawrence. With the New Hero Class coming into service, she was declared surplus, and Renamed 2014-03.

(below) Hastily applied lettering of her new name,  her former 2014-03 name can be seen through the red. (note the freshly painted out CG markings in the photo above)

She was Registered under her current name in Halifax as of Oct 30/2015 to LEEWAY YACHTS LTD.

 (below) A stop in Halifax in 2011. Note the Stern Ramp for the RHIB.

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CCGS Edward Cornwallis refit this August.

 The Feds announced on Friday that NEWDOCK St. John’s Dockyard Limited for important refit and maintenance work for the CCGS Edward Cornwallis.

The CCGS Edward Cornwallis is a high-endurance multi-tasked vessel, light icebreaker and buoy tending vessel based at BIO. Maintenance work includes refurbishment of the hull, galley deck, tanks, propeller tail shaft, and auxiliary and domestic systems.

The Work is scheduled to begin in August, and be completed by October 2015.

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CCGS Samuel Risley Filling In.

With the CCGS Earl Gray undergoing a Mid-life refit, Sister vessel CCGS Samuel Risley is in town filling in. the Risley is the same class of vessel and design as the Earl Grey, and was built by Vito Steel Boat and Barge of Delta, British Columbia in 1984. (Earl Grey was built in Pictou in 1985)

She is normally based in Parry Sound Ontario and operates in the great lakes.

the ship is named after Samuel Risley, the first Chairman of the Board of Steamship Inspection in 1858.

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Phase 2 Arctic Survey set to begin.

From August 7 to September 17, 2015, the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent and the CCGS Terry Fox will be  on a six week scientific survey to collect data needed for Canada’s Arctic continental shelf submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).

The Geological Survey of Canada, part of Natural Resources Canada, and the Canadian Hydrographic Service, part of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, are responsible for this scientific work.  The vessels will survey an area in the Eurasian Basin on the Lomonosov Ridge and areas in the vicinity of the North Pole.

This is the second phase of work that was started by these 2 ships last summer.

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CCGS in the Basin

Sunday Saw CCGS Hudson and CCGS Sir William Alexander exercising with a CCGS Helicopter in the basin. the helicopter had left by the time I arrived, and the vessels were returning to BIO.

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JRCC reports CCGS Ann Harvey Taking on Water

the Halifax Joint Rescue Coordination Center has advised that 2 cormorant Helicopters and 2 vessels have been dispatched to the Coast Guard Ice breaker Ann Harvey, who is reportedly taking on water. Ann Harvey was breaking ice tending buoys off Burgeo NL at the time of the incident.

She spent a week in Halifax In march.

There are 28 persons aboard, 26 crew, along with 2 cadets, and no one has been injured.
reports are the Ingress is due to the vessel striking bottom. The Burgeo Lifeboat CCGS WG George is on scene assisting and has a tow line attached to the Ann Harvey. The Louis St Laurent is 10-12 hours away, and will be released by the CCGS Teleost on her arrival, expected Thursday afternoon.

UPDATE 02/04/15 1000: She has lost propulsion, as Motor Room is flooded. Ann Harvey is powered by 3 diesels, which drive generators. The 2 fixed pitch propellers are driven by electric motors, which are located in the flooded compartment.

the 2 cadets, and 2 non essential crew members have been evacuated from the ship. DND has sent a team of Navy divers to Newfoundland to survey the vessel, and HMCS Charlottetown also departed Halifax Wednesday to provide support.

Louis Ste Laurent was due around midnight, and was planning to tow the Ann Harvey to safe anchorage in Connoire Bay. 

Update 1200: DFO Photo of Ann harvey at anchor

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