Category Archives: Halifax Shipyard

Lévis Shipyard to Refit CCGS Louis St. Laurent

The Government of Canada has awarded a $6.5 million contract to Babcock Canada Inc. for critical refit work for Canadian Coast Guard ship CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent. This contract was awarded as the result of an open and competitive procurement process. The shipyard portion of the work will be carried out by Chantier Davie Canada Inc., a sub-contractor to Babcock Canada. The refit work to be completed on the vessel includes regulatory maintenance to the propulsion systems, hull, auxiliary/domestic systems and the navigation and communications systems. In the past this work has been Caried out in the Nova Dock By Halifax Shipyards.

The CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent is Canada’s largest and heaviest icebreaker. While in drydock at the Davie Shipyard in Lévis, Québec, the vessel will undergo critical maintenance. This work will be completed prior to the vessel’s deployment to the Arctic to provide icebreaking services and other activities including scientific research, search and rescue support, and delivery of essential supplies to remote communities.

File Photo Above.

DND Penelized after 2011 Fuel Spill from Preserver

DND was fined 1$ and mandated to donate $20,000 to the Coastal Research Network and $7,500 to the Environmental Damages Fund as punishment for a March 2011 Spill, while fueling at Imperial Oil. Aprox 14,000 litres of marine diesel fuel was discharged, but caused no damage to the shore or Wildlife.

A Technical investigation conducted by the military determined the spill was caused by a defective valve on the supply ship’s grey-water line, a waste discharge pipe that runs through the main fuel tank. Once the vessel’s fuel tank was loaded to the point that the valve on the waste discharge pipe was submerged, the diesel fuel flowed into that line through the valve and was discharged overboard.

The Preserver had just been returned to the navy from a work period at Halifax shipyard, where repairs were made to the valve assembly running through the tank.

Hero #7 CCGS A. LeBlanc. accepted by Government

Canada’s Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Gail Shea announces the acceptance of the seventh of the Canadian Coast Guard’s new Hero Class vessels, the CCGS A. LeBlanc.

The CCGS A. LeBlanc was named after fisheries officer Agapit LeBlanc, of Bouctouche,
New Brunswick, who joined the Canadian Fisheries and Marine Service in 1920. He was killed on October 20, 1926 while investigating illegal fishing vessels.

This Mid-Shore Patrol Vessel will be based in the Central and Arctic Region and was constructed in Halifax, Nova Scotia by Irving Shipbuilding Inc. A formal naming and dedication ceremony will follow when the vessel arrives in its home region.

Oddly, I Don’t have a picture of her in the water..  

Hero #9 CCGS Captain Goddard M.S.M ready for launch

Hero #9 is lined up on the launch ways ready to go. No word on when the launch will occur, but the yard likely wants her out of the way so they can complete demolition of the assembly hall.
When the CCGS Captain Goddard M.S.M Launches, she will be the last vessel to be launched from these ways, as finished vessels will be completed at the other end of the yard.
UPDATE: Daylight photo Above.
 

Hero #9 Rolled out

The CCGS Captain Goddard M.S.M was rolled out on Monday, after the launching of the CCGS M. Charles Saturday night. With the rollout having occurred, demolition of the remainder of the building can continue, and was quickly resumed this past week. Unlike the previous vessels, she was painted while still in the shop, though is missing her white stripe, name and coast guard markings.

 

Peak at HERO #9

With hero #8 rolled out, today brought the opening of the doors offering a peak at hero #9. She will likely be rolled out for painting at some point this weekend, though that may be dependent on the forecast.

Hero #9, the CCGS Captain Goddard M.S.M.,is named after Canadian Army soldier Captain Nichola Goddard, M.S.M, who has the distinction of being the first female Canadian combat soldier killed in combat, and the 16th Canadian soldier killed in Canadian operations in Afghanistan.