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French Warship FS Aquitaine visits Halifax

Today brought the arival of the French Warship FS Aquitaine. The Aquitaine is the first of a new class of warship, and is on a long cruise as part of her trials. Her previous stop was in Norfolk Virgina.

The FREMM European multimission frigate is a joint build program with France and Italy as initial buyers/developers. Between them, 21 FREMM frigates will be built. An Addtional Frigate for Moroco will be delivered this year.

for more see the article at Naval Technology

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HMCS Toronto Seizes Drugs


HMCS Toronto successfully disrupted a massive narcotics shipment in the Indian Ocean as part of counter-terrorism operations with Combined Task Force 150. 

On Friday March 29, 2013, HMCS Toronto’s naval boarding party searched a suspect vessel as part of ongoing maritime security operations. During this inspection, the boarding team recovered approximately 500 kilograms of heroin with an estimated street value of more than $100 million. The narcotics were confiscated without incident and will be destroyed.

As one of sixteen Canadian Armed Forces missions currently deployed around the world, HMCS Toronto is deployed on Operation Artemis, Canada’s contribution to Combined Task Force 150, combating terrorism in the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean. The crew of the ship is among more than 1,500 soldiers, sailors, airmen, and airwomen making a difference on missions both at home and abroad over this Easter long weekend at sea, in the air, and on land.

Photographs by Corporal Malcolm Byers, HMCS TORONTO via CF Operations Flickr Set

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Operation Caribbe COncludes for 2013

The RCN today marked the conclusion of its first naval deployment of 2013, Operation Caribbe. Operation Caribbe is part of the Government’s continued commitment to combat illicit trafficking in the Caribbean Basin and Eastern Pacific. As part of this commitment, Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships (HMCS) Kingston and Summerside conducted a 36-day deployment while a Royal Canadian Air Force CP-140 Aurora maritime patrol aircraft flew patrols from January 7th to 19th to help suppress trafficking in international waters.

 This is the second time HMCS Kingston has deployed on Operation Caribbe. HMCS Kingston , along with HMCS Goose Bay, conducted surveillance operations in the Western Caribbean from March 2 to April 6, 2012. This deployment marks a number of achievements for the Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels including the embarkation of a United States Coast Guard law enforcement detachment team and the use of the side scan sonar to search for sunken objects associated with counter narcotics trafficking in the Caribbean Basin. Primarily crewed by Naval Reservists, Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels are mainly used for coastal surveillance and patrol.

This recurring annual operation directly supports the Canadian Armed Forces mission to defend against threats and security challenges to Canada and North America and its approaches. Moreover, Operation Caribbe helps strengthen international and continental partnerships and demonstrates Canada’s specific commitment to improve security in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean and to combat transnational organized crime. It also creates opportunities to partner with other nations to suppress criminal activity at sea and keep illegal drugs off Canadian streets.

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Contracts Signed for Final AOPS Design

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women, along with the Honourable Peter MacKay, Minister of National Defence, and the Honourable Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay, Associate Minister of National Defence, today welcomed the signing of the definition contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships project through the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) at an announcement at halifax Shipyards.

This is the next contract signed after the ancillary one announced in July 2012 and it will be followed by a construction contract in 2015. This definition contract is a task-based contract divided into seven work packages (or tasks) that could be awarded. With this contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. will refine and complete the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design to production level prior to construction in 2015. The total potential value of the contract is an estimated $288 million and it will support up to 200 jobs.

Once completed, the definition contract will enable Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to know exactly what to build and how to build it. It will ensure that once the build contract is signed, construction of the ships will begin.  At the same time, work will begin on improving and upgrading the Irving Shipyard to begin full ship construction in 2015.

During the initial discussions regarding the Navy’s Arctic/Offshore patrol ships, Canada and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. agreed that the first contract should be a smaller preliminary contract, followed by a larger definition contract to complete the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design to production level, and subsequently an implementation contract to build and deliver the ships.

This “design-then-build” approach will mitigate both technical and cost risks by reducing unknowns, and therefore risks, for the building phase. Once completed, the definition contract will enable Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to know exactly what to build and how to build it. It will ensure that once the build contract is signed, construction of the ships will begin immediately. This approach is also aligned with the NSPS, which is built upon a more collaborative and risk-sharing relationship.

On July 10, 2012, the Government announced the awarding of a $9.3-million (HST included) preliminary contract to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. Within this preliminary contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. reviewed the existing Canadian-developed Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design and specifications, prepared an execution strategy and delivered a proposal detailing the scope and cost of the subsequent definition contract.

Finally, on March 7, a definition contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. was signed. The total potential value of the contract is an estimated $288 million (taxes included). The definition contract is a task-based contract divided into seven work packages (or tasks) that could be awarded. The first two tasks have been authorized and their total value is approximately $136 million.
The definition contract will last 30 months and we are on track to start cutting steel in 2015.
The Arctic/Offshore patrol ships will be used by National Defence to conduct armed seaborne surveillance in Canada’s economic exclusion zone, including in the Arctic.

The definition contract signed with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. is a task-based contract divided into the following seven work packages (or tasks) that could be awarded. With this contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. will refine and complete the Arctic/Offshore patrol ships design to production level prior to construction in 2015.

  1. Project Management – This task will include all work required to ensure effective planning, management, execution, monitoring and control, and reporting of the definition contract work.
  2. Engineering Design Phase 1 – This task will include the system engineering activities, integrated logistical support analysis and supplier engagement activities that are necessary to demonstrate that the preliminary Arctic/Offshore patrol ship design meets all of the contract design specification requirements with acceptable risk and within the cost and schedule constraints.
  3. Engineering Design Phase 2 – This task will include the system engineering activities, integrated logistical support analysis and supplier engagement activities that are necessary to demonstrate that the Arctic/Offshore patrol ship design is a complete and integrated solution that meets all the contract design specification requirements with acceptable risk and within the cost and schedule constraints.
  4. Engineering Design Phase 3 – This task will include the system engineering activities, integrated logistic support analysis and supplier engagement activities that are necessary to demonstrate that the Arctic/Offshore patrol ship design is a complete and integrated solution that meets all of the contract design specification requirements and is ready for the start of vessel construction.
  5. Project Implementation Proposal Development – This task will encompass all the procurement, engineering, production and estimating activities required to develop the detailed project implementation proposal, including the required plans and a substantive cost for the implementation contract.
  6. Test Production Module – This task will include all the work required to establish and verify production processes and produce a test module prior to beginning vessel construction.
  7. Long Lead Items Procurement – This task will encompass all of the procurement and supply chain activities required to procure long lead items, which must be purchased prior to the start of vessel construction.

Once completed, the definition contract will enable Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to know exactly what to build and how to build it. It will ensure that once the build contract is signed, construction of the ships will begin.

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Progress on non combat NSPS Ships

The Federal Government today announced a series of preliminary contracts valued at a total of $15.7 million for the joint support ships, the CCGS John G. Diefenbaker polar icebreaker and the offshore fisheries science vessels.

As part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS), these initial agreements will enable Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd. to:
assist in the progression and assessment of the joint support ship design options;
initiate a review of the polar icebreaker design; and
refine the offshore fisheries science vessel design and specifications; and produce construction plans and determine requirements for material, subcontractors and labour.

As part of the non-combat package under the NSPS, the joint support ships will replace the Royal Canadian Navy’s auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels. The new polar icebreaker, the CCGS John G. Diefenbaker, will be delivered to coincide with the decommissioning of the Canadian Coast Guard’s heavy icebreaker, the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent, and the offshore fisheries science vessels are intended to replace the CCGS Teleost, the Alfred Needler, and the W.E. Ricker.

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HMCS Athabaskan Moved

HMCS Athabaskan was moved deeper into the dockyard, sometime in the past few weeks. It appears that whatever refit work was remaining is either complete or being done concurently with the re-attachment of the kit that was removed prior to refit. Some Antenas that were removed can be seen in place.