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SNMG-2 to Exercise off North America.

The Nato Standing Maritime group 2, will be departing Rota Spain for exercises on the Atlantic Coast.
though the Makup of the group Can change, it currently consists of :

FGS Niedersachsen (FFG) (Germany)
HMCS Regina (FFH) (Canada)
TCG Kemalreis (FFG) (Turkey)
USS Leyte Gulf (CG)(American)

Halifax may see a west coast frigate. More details when known.

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HMCS Montreal On Trials

Having completed her FELEX refit, HMCS Montreal has spent the last few days on Workups. Montreal is the third Ship to go through the FELEX process, and was returned to the Dockyard back in September. She now Joins Halifax And Fredericton as being complete, and on to workups.

Montreal was used as the test vessel for the cyclone, so she likely carries the modifications for this Helo, as does Halifax. Fredericton retained the Seaking layout, though likely had the deck strengthened.

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French Naval Survey Vessel FS Laplace to visit in July.

Reports are that the French Navy Hydrographic Survey Ship FS Laplace will be updating the Surveys around the French Islands of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. As prt of the voyage, there will be port visit in Halifax for July 1.

A member of the The Lapérouse class of Hydrographic survey ships,  The three ships in class were commissioned into the French Navy between 1988 – 1991.

A791 Lapérouse
A792 Borda
A793 Laplace

The French Naval/Coastguard presence in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon is handled by Fulmar, (Second Post)who makes a regular July stop in Halifax, Usually for Canada Day, or the Start of RNSYS’s Halifax – Saint Pierre race.

Other recent French Naval Visits include stops by Destroyer FS Aquitaine; Tug Malabar;and Sail Training Vessels Belle Poule and Étoile;
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HMCS Athabaskan Tow Report Released.

You Can find our Full Coverage of the HMCS Athabaskan Tow Here

The Canadian Press was able to get the May 2013 report into the tow issues with HMCS Athabaskan. I have not seen the report, so the info below is from the CP Piece. The report, obtained under access-to-information law, says the punctures require 18 square metres of steel to be replaced. Another 711 square metres of the ship needs fresh hull coating because the broken lines rubbed against the vessel, while rails, stanchions and a smashed sonar operator compartment window also have to be replaced, the report says.

the repairs would cost approximately $2 million.

The report says the Defence Department was invoiced about $546,000 by Atlantic Towing to complete the tow from Sydney, N.S., to Halifax, on top of the $707,000 the department has been billed for the initial leg of the journey by original Contract winner Group Ocean.

Investigators say the Ocean Delta,one of the two tugboats involved in the operation suddenly lost power in the Gulf of St. Lawrence between Sept-Iles, Que., and the Magdalen Islands on the morning of Dec. 26 when an air leak caused the clutch to disengage. The tug then spins around, striking the navy ship along one side while its fenders “burst as a result of the force exerted on them during the collision,” the report says.

On the 28ththe tow to Halifax resumed. Then, over a course of hours, four lines snap while the ship is about 10 kilometres off the rocky coast of Scatarie Island. The report says winds did not exceed 45 kilometres per hour and waves were between one to two metres at the time.

The first tow line snapped at 10 p.m. A search and rescue helicopter was deployed by the Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre to bring personnel onto the drifting ship to secure a new line, which was done early on the morning of Dec. 29.

That tow line snapped about five hours later, and then a mooring line was used to continue the tow. But that line also broke a few hours later, and another mooring line was attached.

On Dec. 30 at about 3:40 a.m., that line broke. A third mooring line was then attached to HMCS Athabaskan to return it to Sydney.

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DND Penelized after 2011 Fuel Spill from Preserver

DND was fined 1$ and mandated to donate $20,000 to the Coastal Research Network and $7,500 to the Environmental Damages Fund as punishment for a March 2011 Spill, while fueling at Imperial Oil. Aprox 14,000 litres of marine diesel fuel was discharged, but caused no damage to the shore or Wildlife.

A Technical investigation conducted by the military determined the spill was caused by a defective valve on the supply ship’s grey-water line, a waste discharge pipe that runs through the main fuel tank. Once the vessel’s fuel tank was loaded to the point that the valve on the waste discharge pipe was submerged, the diesel fuel flowed into that line through the valve and was discharged overboard.

The Preserver had just been returned to the navy from a work period at Halifax shipyard, where repairs were made to the valve assembly running through the tank.

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