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Ships Starting Here AOPS Contract Signed.

  In a technical briefing with media in Ottawa Friday morning, representatives from Public Works Government Services Canada, the Canadian Navy and Irving Shipbuilding provided an overview of the Arctic Offshore Patrol ship program including the ship’s design and capability, the number of ships to be built and the construction schedule.

The Shipyards contract with the government is for six ships. The build contract is valued at $2.3 billion. Should costs increase due to unforeseen factors, the contract will guarantee the delivery of five ships within the same ceiling price ($2.3 billion). Basically the contract is for 5, but if they come in at a good price, they will build 6.

Construction of the first sections of the vessels – known as initial blocks or production test modules – will begin in June. The shipyard will test its new infrastructure, environment and production processes, with these initial blocks. Cutting of steel for the first AOPS ship is on target for September 2015.

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FELEX Update – first 4 done

The Defense minister held a press conference to Announce the The first 4 frigates modernized as part of the FELEX program, HMCS Halifax, Fredericton, Calgary, and Winnipeg are complete, and ready for operational deployment.

For East Coast Boats,
Montreal Is in Post Update workups,
Charlottetown is at the Machine Shop Wharf, St. John’s is in the Graving Dock.
Ville De Quebec is Preparing to go to the shipyard this fall at the dockyard, and HMCS Toronto is on deployment, scheduled to enter the yard in the summer.

HMCS Fredricton will be the first to be deployed, Presumably as HMCS Toronto’s Replacement in the Standing Nato Maritime Group.

Video below shows some of the work done. The ships look to get gutted at the shipyard.

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HMCS Iroquois Final Sail-past tomorrow?

I have heard a rumour that HMCS Iroquois’ final sail past will occur tomorrow. Due to cracks in her structure, she is due to be de-commisioned, and has already be de-amunitioned.

If anyone has more details, Please email Info@halifaxshippingnews.ca 

UPDATE: It appears there will be no sailpast. A Call to QHM revelealed they had no knowledge of it, and a former crew member emailed to say he talked to a current crew member who said there will not be one.

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Anchor from HMCS Niobe Uncovered



An anchor, believed to have belonged to His Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS)Niobe, has been unearthed at HMC Dockyard in Halifax. HMCS Niobe was the first Canadian warship to enter Canada’s territorial waters, on October 21, 1910, a landmark event in the beginnings of the Naval Service of Canada.

As fate would have it, the discovery of the roughly 900-kilo (2000-pound) anchor was made just days before the commemoration of Niobe Day, which will from now on, be celebrated annually by the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) on the 21st day of October. An excavation crew working at HMC Dockyard recovered an anchor and chain buried beneath a demolition site on the morning of October 14. The anchor has been inspected, assessed against relevant documents and photographs, and is now believed to be that of HMCS Niobe.

The anchor was unearthed at former Jetty 4, where Building D-19, a Second World War dockside warehouse and one of the first structures at HMC Dockyard, once stood and is now being demolished.

The position of the anchor speaks to a particular time and function. The direction of the chain links is consistent with the position of the Niobe’s bow when employed as a depot ship and the size is consistent with an estimated size of the links of the Niobe’s anchor in a post-Halifax Explosion photo. 
While a list of stores left behind by the Royal Navy is not available, no vessels in the newly formed Royal Canadian Navy were large enough for this size anchor except for the Niobe, or possibly the Rainbow (based in Esquimalt, BC). Additionally there would have been no other use for a heavy chain and anchor at the discovery site, except to permanently moor a large vessel such as Niobe.

After she was paid off, Niobe functioned as a depot ship from July, 1915 until 1920 moored in Halifax Harbour. The Halifax Explosion on December 6, 1917, pulled the ship’s concrete embedded anchor from the harbour floor and dragged the ship. Once re-secured to Jetty 4, additional anchors were put in place including one to the shore from the stem and one from the stern. The anchor that has been discovered is believed to be one of these three bow anchors that were used to keep Niobe in place

The dimensions of the roughly 900-kilo (2000-pound) anchor are, 4 metres (13 feet) from crown to head, 4.1 metres (13.5 feet) across the stock, and 3.35 metres (11 feet) from bill to bill of the flukes. Additionally, each link of the anchor’s chain is 51 centimetres (20 inches) by 28 centimetres (11 inches) and weighs approximately 34 kilos (75 pounds)
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HMCS Algonquin, Athabaskan, Iroquois and Protecteur to retire

Global news Is reporting the navy will announce the retirement of four aging ships, HMCS Algonquin, Athabaskan, Iroquois and Protecteur.

Iroquois is suffering from cracks, Protecteur suffered a fire and both are beyond economical repair. Algonquin I don’t know about, but suspect Athabaskan will survive until due for a refit in a few years.

UPDATE: DND has invited press to a technical briefing teleconference with Admiral Mark Norman, Commander RCN at 3pm atlantic today.

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AOPS Has A name

The Government today announced the name of the first of the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS). Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Harry DeWolf, named in honour of a wartime Canadian naval hero, will be the first of a fleet of AOPS designed to better enable the RCN to exercise sovereignty in Canadian waters, including in the Arctic. The Prime Minister made the announcement at His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida, formerly commanded by Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf, which currently serves as a museum ship and is located on the waterfront of Hamilton, Ontario.

Subsequent ships in the class will be named to honour other prominent Canadians who served with the highest distinction and conspicuous gallantry in the service of their country. The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships Class will henceforth be known as the Harry DeWolf Class, with Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Harry DeWolf as the lead ship.

A native of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf (RCN) was decorated for outstanding service throughout his naval career, which included wartime command of His Majesty’s Canadian Ship St. Laurent from 1939-40, for which he was twice the subject of a Mention in Dispatches (a national honour bestowed for distinguished service). Later, his 1943-44 command of His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida helped that ship gain the reputation as “Fightingest Ship in the RCN,” participated in the sinking of 14 enemy ships, and for which he was again twice the subject of a Mention in Dispatches and awarded both the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Service Cross. A consummate leader both ashore and afloat, his exceptional wartime service was recognized with an appointment as a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and as an Officer of the U.S. Legion of Merit. He was also awarded the Canadian Forces Decoration, soon after its creation, to recognize his good conduct throughout his career. He went on to become a popular and effective postwar Chief of the Naval Staff from 1956 until 1960. 

For the first time in its 104-year history, the RCN will name a class of ships after a prominent Canadian naval figure. Vessels have traditionally been named for cities, rivers and Native tribes.
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