Category Archives: new build

Min of Defence Announce Davie conversion for Temp Supply Ship

WATCH Defence Minister Jason Kenney LIVE here at 1 pm ET
CBC News has learned that Defence Minister Jason Kenney will announce today a plan for Quebec’s Davie shipyard to retrofit a commercial cargo ship to serve as a temporary naval supply ship.
CBCNews.ca and CBC News Network will livestream his announcement at National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa starting at 1 p.m. ET.

Davie shipyard is located in Levis, Que., the riding of Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney

UPDATE: DND Posted the Press release early. These are the Key Parts:

The earlier than anticipated retirement of the Protecteur-class ships has resulted in an unexpected loss of both capacity and capability for the RCN during this transition to the future fleet. The Government of Canada will enter into discussions with Chantier Davie to see if arrangements can be made for an interim ship that provides a solution at a cost, time, and level of capability acceptable to Canada and the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN).

Interim Auxiliary Oil Replenishment Capability

The Government will enter into preliminary discussions with Chantier Davie Canada Inc. to determine if it can provide an interim supply ship at a cost, time, and level of capability acceptable to Canada and the Royal Canadian Navy. Should the Government of Canada decide to pursue a provision of service contract agreement, it would provide a required interim ship to bridge the gap until the first JSS is delivered.
The provision of service contract agreement would be for a commercial ship to be refitted for military use. An interim supply ship would provide a more modest capability and would not conduct full-spectrum military operations in high-threat environments.
The Full release:

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) is in the midst of the most intensive and comprehensive period of fleet modernization and renewal in its peacetime history, touching upon all elements of the fleet.
This period of transition includes the modernization of its 12 Halifax-class frigates, the retirement of two Protecteur-class replenishment ships and two Iroquois-class destroyers and the procurement of three new classes of ships, including the Joint Support Ships (JSS), the Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships and the Canadian Surface Combatants, as well as the integration of new maritime helicopters into fleet service.
The earlier than anticipated retirement of the Protecteur-class ships has resulted in an unexpected loss of both capacity and capability for the RCN during this transition to the future fleet. The Government of Canada will enter into discussions with Chantier Davie to see if arrangements can be made for an interim ship that provides a solution at a cost, time, and level of capability acceptable to Canada and the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN).

Retirement of HMCS Protecteur and HMCS Preserver

On September 19, 2014, Vice-Admiral Mark Norman, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, announced the retirement of the Navy’s legacy refueling fleet. HMCS Protecteur was an AOR ship based in Esquimalt, BC, and the lead ship of the Protecteur-class. Its sister ship, HMCS Preserver, was based in Halifax, NS.
HMCS Protecteur was retired after sustaining serious damage in a fire in February 2014. An extensive assessment concluded that the ship was damaged beyond economical repair. Considering the relatively short service life remaining for HMCS Protecteur, which was scheduled to be retired in 2017, the cost to re-instate the ship to full operational capability did not represent the best use of public funds.
HMCS Preserver was scheduled for retirement in 2016, but engineering surveys done in 2014 identified levels of corrosion that had degraded the structural integrity of the ship below acceptable limits. As a result, the cost to reinstate the ship to full operational capability also did not represent a responsible use of public funds.
These unexpected circumstances have resulted in the urgent need for Canada to obtain refuelling capacity in the short term to bridge the gap until the first Joint Support Ship is delivered.

The future Joint Support Ships

The Joint Support Ship (JSS) project is designed to increase the range and endurance of the Canadian Armed Forces by enabling naval task groups to stay at sea for long periods without obtaining provisions from ashore. The Joint Support Ships will supply deployed Naval Task Groups with fuel, ammunition, spare parts, food and water. They will also provide an at-sea platform for maintenance and operation of helicopters, a limited sealift capability, and support to operations ashore.
As the selected shipyard for non-combat vessels, Vancouver Shipyards will be responsible for the construction of both Joint Support Ships at their shipyard in North Vancouver, British Columbia.
The two Queenston-class Joint Support Ships (JSS) will replace the Royal Canadian Navy’s Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment vessels. The new ships will provide core replenishment, sealift capabilities, and support to operations ashore. The Queenston-class will be capable of operating across a full spectrum of threat environments.
The JSS are a critical component for achieving success in both international and domestic CAF missions. The ships constitute a vital and strategic national asset. The presence of replenishment ships increases the range and endurance of a Naval Task Group, permitting it to remain at sea for significant periods of time without going to shore for replenishment.

Interim Auxiliary Oil Replenishment Capability

The Government will enter into preliminary discussions with Chantier Davie Canada Inc. to determine if it can provide an interim supply ship at a cost, time, and level of capability acceptable to Canada and the Royal Canadian Navy. Should the Government of Canada decide to pursue a provision of service contract agreement, it would provide a required interim ship to bridge the gap until the first JSS is delivered.
The provision of service contract agreement would be for a commercial ship to be refitted for military use. An interim supply ship would provide a more modest capability and would not conduct full-spectrum military operations in high-threat environments.

More Ferry Builds for A.F. Theriault and Sons

A.F. Theriault and Sons Ltd., in Meteghan River, Digby Co., has been awarded the contract to build the new Digby Neck ferry.

The new ferry will replace the 20-year-old Joe Casey. The Joe Casey will be used as a spare ferry for provincial operations. The ferry will be about 35 metres long and 13 metres wide, accommodating 18 cars with additional seating for 10 passengers.

The government has a fleet of nine ferries operating around the province. Delivery of the new ferry is expected to be late next year.

The Joe Casey (Left) was also built by A.F. Theriault and Sons. the Joe Casey provides service to Brier Island and carries over 30,000 vehicles and 75,000 passengers per year.

New ACL vessels named by Haligonian

 Construction is progressing on Atlantic Container Line’s new G4 vessels, which will be the largest RORO/Containerships in the world. The G4 vessels will replace ACL’s existing fleet of G3’s operating in the company’s transatlantic service.
 

The new G4 Fleet is being named Atlantic Star, Atlantic Sail, Atlantic Sea, Atlantic Skyand Atlantic Sun. Andrea Cox, who started with ACL in September 1996, submitted the winning names. Andrea is a Customer Service Representative at ACL’s Halifax Customer Service Center. Andrea said she chose the names based on her daily experience with customers. 

 
When the construction of the G‐4’s began in 2013, ACL’s parent company, the Grimaldi Group, decided that ACL’s employees would hold a contest to name the new vessels. Over 5,000 name proposals were received. Each ACL country manager and department manager picked his/her favorite 25 sets of 5 names. The most frequently selected 25 name sets were submitted to Grimaldi Group Management in Italy, who chose the winner. 
 
The new G4 vessels will be bigger, faster, greener and more efficient than their predecessors. The G4’s will have a container capacity of 3,800 TEUs plus 28,900 square meters of RORO space, with a car capacity of 1307 vehicles. The new ships will continue to employ cell‐guides on deck, a feature that will allow ACL to extend its enviable record of never losing a container at sea in over 30 years. The first ACL G4 will enter service next summer, followed every two months by a sister vessel until the entire ACL fleet is replaced.
 
 

Proposal for Another Ferry Naming Contest

Documents released to go for council propose holding another naming contest for New Harbour ferries to be delivered in 2015 and 2018. A naming contest was used to choose the name Christopher Stannix for the most recent build.
 Administrative Order #46 was approved by Regional Council on June 26,2013, and specifically allowed the use of Council approved contests to name ferries. The approved motion also outlined that permission from Regional Council would be required to commence another naming contest.

 HRM Regional Council could choose to not approve the ferry naming contests. In this case, the ferry would be named in accordance with the process established by Administrative Order #46. There is currently a commemorative name that Regional Council has already approved that would be eligible to be placed on a ferry or road; that name is ‘Lamont Power’, who was part of the Halifax Harbour Pilotage from 1906 – 1954 and served in both World Wars.

 If Regional Council were to reject the Ferry Naming Contest and move forward with ‘Lamont Power’, it would begin a formal naming process that would require the approval of the applicant for their name suggestion to be incorporated into the new harbour ferry.

HRM has tendered for a builder for these 2 ferries, however no decision has been announced as of yet.

NS Tenders for New Grand Passage Ferry

The Province of Nova Scotia Today issued a tender for the construction of a new 18 car Ferry to run on Grand passage, which is the run between Long island and Brier Island at the end of Digby Neck.

The Route is Currently served by the Joe Casey, Built by AF Theriault in 1995. the Digby neck is also severed by the 2003 Halifax shipyard built Petit Princess, which runs between the mainland and long island. (See those boats here)

Its unclear what the plan for the Joe Cassey is, however she will likely take the place of one of the older ferries in the Provincial highways fleet. its worth noting that the design calls for dual Voith Drives – like the Halifax Harbour ferries use, and unlike the Z drive arrangement used on the current boats.

you can grab the tender documents, Which include a full drawing set at:http://novascotia.ca/tenders/tenders/tender-details.aspx?id=60146868

Group Ocean Moves East – Building Floating Dry dock in Bas-Caraquet

The New Brunswick government, the New Brunswick Naval Centre, and Group Océan  have signed an agreement aimed at reviving the shipbuilding and repair sector in Bas-Caraquet, which will generate up create up to 77 jobs and stimulate other economic spinoffs.

“Reviving shipbuilding in northern New Brunswick is important for job creation and supporting our provincial economy,” said Premier David Alward. “The arrival of Océan opens the door for shipbuilding and repair work to resume in northeast New Brunswick.”
The  tripartite agreement stipulates that Océan will establish its operations at the Naval Center of New Brunswick through a long-term lease. In the coming months, Océan will begin the first phase of the construction of a floating dry dock with a capacity of nearly 7,000 tons.

The dry dock will be constructed in three sections to reach a total length of 105 metres (350 ft.).
This large-scale equipment, which complements Océan’s current inventory, will bolster the range of services the company offers to customers. The dry dock will also meet the needs of Océan for the repair of its largest vessels. The creation of 57 to 77 jobs over a five-year period is planned under the agreement.

For Comparison, the ScotiaDock 2 was 150m, and the Novadock is 250m. this looks to be poised to bid on non NSPS government business (new naval tugs, etc) and compete for smaller repair jobs with Shelburne ship repair.

File photo above Dredge Ocean Traverse Nord taking in supplies before heading to do contract in the carribean. the Dredge was built at Ocean’s yard in Quebec.

2 More Ferries for HRM

On today’s council agenda is a tender award for Two Additional Harbour Ferries. These Boats will replace Halifax III and Dartmouth III which have been in Service since 1978.

The Construction of the 2 new ferries will be done by  A.F. Theriault & Son Ltd.,
for a Total Tender Price of $8,835,527 with planned delivery of the first and second ferries in April 2015 and April 2018 respectively;

The 4th Ferry, Christopher Stannix, was Recently delivered by A.F. Theriault & Son Ltd, and the new boats will be built to the same design. The 2015 build is expected to Replace the Dartmouth III, as the Halifax III recently underwent a period of Extended Maintenance.

2 Addtional bids were recived – Aecon Atlantic bid $11,440,695.63 for the 2 boats, and Ocean Industries (Part of Groupe Ocean) bid $14,082,912.84

New Schooner to be built in Lunenburg

Westergard and Sons are excited to announce the successful agreement with the Waterfront Development Corporation to lease the famous Bluenose Shed on the historic Lunenburg Waterfront. The long unattended building will be revived to its original purpose for the construction of a 60′ gaff-rigged schooner for the Blue Dream Project. This is also the Shed that the Bounty Was constructed in.

The Alaskan yellow cedar for the Blue Dream Project has arrived at the Bluenose shed in Lunenburg. The planking was sourced in BC and eventually shipped via rail to Halifax, and then by truck to  Lunenburg, NS. So accurate is the sawing that the planks will not need to be dressed before hanging them on the new schooner. This is a new shipment but the same species of wood used in the planking for the Twin Schooner Project, Built up the road at the Dory Shop.

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