Category Archives: news

Norweigan frigate KNM Helge Ingstad Struck by Tanker, In danger of sinking

KNM Helge is a Nansen Class Frigate. Pictured is KNM Thor Heyerdahl on a2012 port visit to Halifax

The Norwegian frigate KNM Helge Ingstad was stuck early this morning by the tanker SOLA TS while anchored west of Bergen. The tanker had just loaded North Sea Crude oil, and was departing the fjord when the incident happened.

the frigate appears to have been stuck in the stern area, and flooding continues, with the latest images showing the frigate nearly on its side, a significantly worse state then shortly after the collision, when the frigate was simply low in the stern. the ship also appears to have deliberately run aground at the bow, in an attempt to keep the ship from sinking,

the Frigate was participating in the Nato Exercise Trident Juncture, which also featured Canadian frigates HMCS Halifax and HMCS Toronto. the 137 crew members were able to evacuate the ship, with 7 minor injuries reported. Marine traffic reports the frigate was not broadcasting AIS at the time.

 

UPDATE 11/09:

New imagery from the Norwegians this morning. looks like the ship has settled on her side. She was not broadcasting AIS at the time of the collision, and appears to have been holed by the tankers protruding anchor hawsepipe, which looks to have left a large gash from the hanger aft.

Still taken from this video

 

from yesterday:

Update 11/10:

she looks to be down more on her side.

Update 11/13:
Shes Sunk. Overnight the 7 lines holding the ship to shore broke, and she slipped beneath the waves. The Norwegian government announced on the 12th that the ship was secure.

Word is she was actually sailing when the incident occured, and not anchored, and was aware of the presence of the outgoing tanker. An audio log obtained by Norwegian media has revealed that the frigate failed to change course despite repeated warnings that she was on collision course with the tanker. Significant questions about Seamanship and damage control need to be asked after this incident.

 

Update 11/14

CSC Winner Announced

the federal government issued a release identifying Lockheed Martin as the preferred design for the CSC. Canada’s Combat Ship Team – composed of Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems and CAE, MDA, L3 Technologies, and Ultra Electronics – submitted a proposal based on the British Type 26 Global Combat Ship. the British are currently building this ship, though it is not yet in service.

so much for a proven off the shelf design. I covered the 3 eligible bidders in a post earlier this year.

Anyway, the release says:

The Government of Canada and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. have identified Lockheed Martin Canada Inc. as the preferred bidder to provide the design and design team for the Royal Canadian Navy’s future Canadian Surface Combatants.

While this represents a significant milestone in the competitive process, more work is required before a contract is awarded.

Lockheed Martin Canada Inc. must now go through the “due diligence process,” which includes:

  • negotiations with the company on intellectual property rights
  • an assessment of combat systems performance
  • an assessment of the company’s financial capability to deliver the project, together with the verification of various other administrative matters

Should the preferred bidder not successfully demonstrate to Canada and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. that it meets all of the due diligence requirements, then the next highest ranked compliant bidder will become the preferred bidder. The new preferred bidder will then have to successfully demonstrate that it meets all of the due diligence requirements.

The identification of the preferred bidder follows a rigorous bid evaluation process. This process has been, and will continue to be, overseen by an independent Fairness Monitor. To date, the Fairness Monitor has submitted a series of interim reports on the Canadian Surface Combatant procurement process, and each of these reports have not identified any fairness deficiencies.

More recently, the Fairness Monitor provided the following statement to Public Services and Procurement Canada:

“As the Fairness Monitor for the Canadian Surface Combatant project, we have monitored the evaluation of proposals submitted in response to the Request for Proposals and have identified no fairness deficiencies. It is our opinion that the evaluation of proposals was conducted in a fair manner. Decisions were made objectively and free from personal favouritism or improper influence, and the process encompassed the elements of openness, competitiveness, transparency and compliance with the Request for Proposals.”

A contract award is expected this winter, with construction beginning in the early 2020s.

The Canadian Surface Combatant project is the largest, most complex procurement ever undertaken by the Government of Canada. These ships will form the backbone of our Royal Canadian Navy and will be Canada’s major surface component of maritime combat power for decades to come.

The Government of Canada remains committed to being open and transparent at each stage of the procurement process.

Coast Guard to get Icebreakers, Emergency towing Vessels.


On Friday, the Feds signed a contract for $610million to have Davie acquire and convert 3 Icebreakers for Coast Guard use. The first ship is to be delivered by December 2018, with the other 2 to be delivered in Summer  and fall 2019.

The ships were built for the offshore industry to work in Alaska, so should be well suited for the job. The Proposed ships are Tor Viking II, Balder Viking and Vidar Viking. the Ships are owned by Norwegian tor, but are flagged, and currently are tied up in Sweden. Built to DNV Ice-10 standards, they will be classed as medium icebreakers in CG Service.

In a separate announcement last week, the feds awarded a contract for emergency towing vessels. the need for these vessels became apparent After several ships broke down in BC Waters, and were rescued by US based Tugs, the feds have awarded a contract to Atlantic towing to provide 2 emergency towing vessels in BC waters for the next 3 years. Word is Atlantic Eagle and Atlantic Raven will be the ships stationed on the west coast.

Final CSC Bidders – One of these 3 will be the Next Canadian Warship.

The 3 consortiums that submitted bids for the CSC had their final Submissions due last Friday on the 20th. this final submission allowed them to clean up and clarify portions of the submissions based on feedback from the federal government and Irving.

The Three Bidders Are:

Canada’s Combat Ship Team – composed of Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems and CAE, MDA, L3 Technologies, and Ultra Electronics – submitted their proposal based on the British Type 26 Global Combat Ship. the British are currently building this ship, though it is not yet in service.

Alion Science and Technology-led team with a proposal based on the De Zeven Provinciën Air Defence and Command frigate which is in service with the Dutch Navy. The combat system solution is based on the world-class capabilities of ATLAS-Elektronik and Hensoldt Sensors

The third bidder is Spanish Navantia with its F-105 frigate design. The company will partner with Saab and CEA Technologies to deliver the ships should it be selected. The F-105 is a variation of the Spanish Álvaro de Bazán-class frigates and is the basis for the Norwegian Fridtjof Nansen class, and the under construction Australian Hobart Class.  The ships use the American Ageis system. Their CSC Proposal  is fitted with a 127mm main gun by Leonardo, a CEAFAR2 radar by CEA, 2x RAM launchers by Raytheon, 2x 35mm Millenium CIWS guns by Rheinmetall, 48x VLS and 8x RBS-15 Mk3 anti-ship missiles by Saab

3.5 million to repair HMCS Sackville

The federal government today announced a contribution of up to $3.5 million to the Canadian Naval Memorial Trust for extensive repairs to HMCS Sackville.

As Canada’s oldest warship and the sole remaining Flower-class corvette, HMCS Sackville is an important part of Royal Canadian Navy history.

HMCS Sackville has been owned by the non-profit Canadian Naval Memorial Trust since the 1980s, operating seasonally on the Halifax waterfront as Canada’s Naval Memorial and a museum ship.

Most of the repair work is expected to be completed at the Fleet Maintenance Facility (FMF) Cape Scott located within Her Majesty’s Canadian (HMC) Dockyard Halifax.

Tours and visits to HMCS Sackville will be discontinued until the repairs are completed, which, pending an assessment, is expected to be in summer 2018.

Addtional Announced CSC Bids

Bids for the CSC were due today, and 2 additional bids have been publicly announced. the French/Italian consortium has proposed their FREMM Design, used by France, Italy, morocco and Egypt, and under consideration by Australia. in an interesting twist, the consortium maintains the 15 ships can be built by Irving at the original 30 billion project estimate.

A bid was also received from Alion Canada, offering the Dutch  Provincien Command frigate. this ship went into service with the dutch navy in the early 2000’s so is only somewhat newer then the current Halifax class. I have no record of this ship class visiting Halifax.

UPDATE:

A 4th bid has been announced coming from Spanish firm Navanta. The F-105 is a variation of the Spanish Álvaro de Bazán-class frigates and is the basis for the Norwegian Fridtjof Nansen class (Pictured above), and the under construction Australian Hobart Class.  The ships use the American Ageis system.

Athabaskan to be Scrapped

The federal government issued a tender to “dispose of, through Ship Breaking, the former HMCS ATHABASKAN”

This means she is to be scrapped, rather then preserved as a museum ship. You can read the Tender at https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-ERD-003-26503

Halterm Upgrades Yard Equipment

Halterm yesterday announced the purchase of new equipment.

The terminal will be spending 10Million Dollars over the next year to increase refer capacity by 25%, as well as purchasing 3 Kone Rubber Tire Gantries (or RTG). The 3 units are expected to be delivered in February (1) and October (2) of next year. The New RTG’s will straddle a container stack 5 high, and 6 wide.

The terminal also recently began scraping the 3 original container cranes. Small, and unused, they took up space at the end of the pier.

This continues a recent history of new equipment since the Installation of the New Super Post Panamax Cranes in 2014. Earlier this year the Terminal took delivery of new Kone Reachstackers

Kalmar Ottawa Yard tractors and Toplifts.

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