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Thorco Crown Safe in Sydney

The Thorco Crown was successfully towed to Sydney by Svitzer Bedford, and tied up last night. The vessel was sailing of Newfoundland, when she suffered an Engine room Fire and lost power. Thorco Crown is 3 years old. Svitzer has 3 tugs based in the port Hawksbury area. After the Thorco Crown Lost power, the CCGS William Alexander was able to take her under tow.

 

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M/V Arrow Oil Spill circa 1970

ARROW was an enlarged version of the standard American wartime tanker design. She was one of the oldest tankers in the fleet of Aristotle Onassis, owned by the holding company Sunstone Marine Panama. At only 11379 Tons, she is about the size of  AlgoCanada, one of the many products tankers that frequent Halifax.

On February 4, 1970 ARROW was approaching Port Hawkesbury under charter to Imperial Oil Limited and just about to complete a voyage from Aruba. She was carrying 10 million litres of Bunker “C” oil bound for a paper company near Point Tupper. Entering Chedabucto Bay, the tanker encountered severe weather and gale force winds. She ran aground on Cerberus Rock, a well-known navigational hazard that lies in wait just below the surface of the bay. While it initially appeared that there was no threat of fuel leakage, the heavy weather continued to pound the stricken tanker.

Imperial Oil issued an oil spill alert and the crew were evacuated. By the next day, an oil slick one mile long had formed and on the 8th, the ship finally split in two, with the stern sinking in deeper water. Attempts to take off the cargo were not successful nor were the attempts to recover her stern. In all, about 10,330 tons of fuel were spilled, coating 75 miles of the shoreline with thick black sludge threatening wildlife and the fishery.

Shore cleanup was a long difficult process as was the transfer of what was left of the oil aboard ARROW to the barge, IRVING WHALE (Ironically the IRVING WHALE became an another environmental concern a few months later when she sank off Prince Edward Island with oil and PCBs which had to be recovered in 1996.) The final retrieval of oil from the ARROW wreck was completed on April 11 and pioneered many clean-up techniques used in later tanker disasters.

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British Merlin Arrives – Svitzer Nerthus gets a Job

The Disabled Tanker British Merlin arrived after midnight this morning, and took to anchorage 1. She was towed to port by Maersk Cutter, and Helped to Anchor by Altantic Oak and Willow.

Once she took up anchor, Svitzer Nerthus went along side to provide propulsion if needed.

British Merlin suffered from an engine failure enroute from Whiffen Head NL to Philidephia.

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Atlantic Star – Teething Issues

Atlantic Stars first Atlantic Crossing was Apparently a little rough.
On Arrival in Halifax, It was discovered that the RO-RO ramp would not lower.

No word on a Cause, but she is spending the night.

I Should Note, that A few Issues are to be expected on the first trip, of a new ship, of  a new Design.

UPDATE:
The ramp was down  when I drove by this morning, so all appears to be good now.

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HH Emilia for repairs.

 Due today is the HH Emilia –  On arrival, she is set to discharge all her containers due to engine troubles. presumably this will be picked up by the next Maersk vessel.

The ship is part of the Vespucci Service,  Asia and the US East Coast via Panama. The port rotation is Qindao – Ningbo – Shanghai -(Panama)- Cartagena – Savannah – Charleston – Norfolk – New York – Norfolk – Charleston  – Savannah – Qingdao, so the ship came north to offload.

This is the second time a CMA-CGM Ship has failed in Halifax – The Stadt Cadiz spent time at Pier 9B in May sorting out engine troubles. She also unloaded all her cans.

If the Ship looks Familer, she is the Ex Dresden Express –  sold by Hapag Llyod earlier this year. – Hapag-Llyod is disposing of her class – either selling or scrapping the vessels.

Correction: I Originally posted that the ship was filling CMA-CGM’s slot on the weekly Maersk Service. this was incorrect, as now noted above.

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containers off the Pier at Halterm

CBC Is reporting 2 containers were lost in the water at Halterm.
ZIM Vancouver and ZIM Haifa are both tied up at Pier 41/42. the most likely scenario is a container was swung by a crane  into the stack aboard ship, knocking 2 into the water.

Update:

I’m told it happened Early into the Night Shift, and shipfax stated it was 2 20foot containers. these can be handled as a pair, so its possible the spreader on the crane failed.

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Farley Mowat sinks in Shelburne.

Yesterday, the Ex SeaShepard conservation Society vessel Farley Mowat rolled over and sank in Shelburne. The vessel was arrested by the feds during Anti-Sealing Protests several years ago, and eventually sold. she was toed to Halifax, Then Lunenburg, where her topsides were removed. She was then towed to Shelburne.

(Above) Farley Mowat in Lunenburg, still intact in 2012.
(Below) Stripped down, June 23 2014

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Cruise ship Saint Laurent taking on water

Reports are that the small cruise ship Saint Laurent is taking on water in a lock on the seaway. She was bound for Toronto.

Saint Laurent visited Halifax last week. The ship appears to be in the lock which suggests she bumped the side entering the lock.
More details to follow.
UPDATES:
Several injuries are reported. Photos on Twitter show the bow impaled by part of the lock. The lock has re portly been drained so the ship is sitting on the dry bottom of the lock.

UPDATE 06/19 0900:
Michael Folsom @theshipwatcher has a Source on scene providing Photos. I have posted a few bellow for the benefit of non Twitter users. It appears that the Ship went to far forward in the lock, and struck the ledge that the upper lock gate sits on.

Update 06/20:
Group Ocean tugs are on route and last noted near Montreal. Presumably they will pull the boat out of the lock. Seaway rraffic is backing up in both directions due to the closure.
Reports are that a Canadian river pilot was aboard, and that the Saint Laurent suddenly accelerated when the auto pilot was disengaged.
The size of the impact dent suggests she had some speed when she hit the lock, which would be abnormal for entering a lock.
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TSB Releases Report into John I Grounding

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today released its investigation report (M14A0051) into the 14 March 2014 flooding, grounding, and subsequent evacuation of the bulk carrier John I off the southwest coast of Newfoundland and Labrador. There were no injuries to the 23 crew members.

We covered the grounding and tow in a couple of posts as events unfolded.
 
The John I entered ice-covered waters off the southwest coast of Newfoundland on its way to Montreal, Quebec, from Las Palmas, Spain. After the engine cooling water temperature began to rise, the crew opened the sea water strainer housing and found that the strainer was plugged. As the crew began removing ice and slush from the strainer, water began to overflow from the open strainer housing. When the crew attempted to close the leaking sea chest valve to stop the flow of water, its operating mechanism failed. Sea water began to enter the vessel in an uncontrolled manner, overflowing into the engine room. The master then ordered the vessel to be blacked out, causing it to drift. As the vessel drifted towards the shore, commercial towing assistance was requested, but delayed due to the weather.
Upon its arrival on scene, the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Earl Grey offered to tow the John I away from the shore. Further delays were encountered while the John I’s master conferred with the vessel’s managing company, the CCG and the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC). When the master finally accepted the tow, the first attempt to establish a tow line failed, and the vessel’s proximity to the shoals did not allow for completion of a second attempt. The John I then ran aground on the shoals. The crew members were evacuated by helicopter. The vessel’s hull sustained minor damage.
The investigation found that warmed sea water from the engine cooling system was being partially discharged overboard and partially returned to the main sea water pump suction, rather than being recirculated to the low sea chest to prevent ice buildup. The strainer became plugged with ice and slush. The sea chest valve was prevented from fully closing, likely due to ice buildup, and the valve operating mechanism failed due to overstress when the crew forcibly attempted to close it, which led to the flooding.
The JRCC did not have the authority to direct the master of the John I to accept the tow. Neither the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Environmental Response nor Transport Canada, both of which had the authority to direct the vessel to accept the tow, were actively involved at an earlier stage when it was clear that the time to take action was running out and the environmental risks posed by the vessel going aground were increasing. The delay in starting the towing operation was caused both by the master’s reluctance to accept the tow and by the way that authorities managed the situation. If all authorities responsible for dealing with an emergency are not involved in a timely and coordinated manner, there is a risk that response options will be limited and the situation will escalate

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