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HMCS Athabaskan Tow Report Released.

You Can find our Full Coverage of the HMCS Athabaskan Tow Here

The Canadian Press was able to get the May 2013 report into the tow issues with HMCS Athabaskan. I have not seen the report, so the info below is from the CP Piece. The report, obtained under access-to-information law, says the punctures require 18 square metres of steel to be replaced. Another 711 square metres of the ship needs fresh hull coating because the broken lines rubbed against the vessel, while rails, stanchions and a smashed sonar operator compartment window also have to be replaced, the report says.

the repairs would cost approximately $2 million.

The report says the Defence Department was invoiced about $546,000 by Atlantic Towing to complete the tow from Sydney, N.S., to Halifax, on top of the $707,000 the department has been billed for the initial leg of the journey by original Contract winner Group Ocean.

Investigators say the Ocean Delta,one of the two tugboats involved in the operation suddenly lost power in the Gulf of St. Lawrence between Sept-Iles, Que., and the Magdalen Islands on the morning of Dec. 26 when an air leak caused the clutch to disengage. The tug then spins around, striking the navy ship along one side while its fenders “burst as a result of the force exerted on them during the collision,” the report says.

On the 28ththe tow to Halifax resumed. Then, over a course of hours, four lines snap while the ship is about 10 kilometres off the rocky coast of Scatarie Island. The report says winds did not exceed 45 kilometres per hour and waves were between one to two metres at the time.

The first tow line snapped at 10 p.m. A search and rescue helicopter was deployed by the Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre to bring personnel onto the drifting ship to secure a new line, which was done early on the morning of Dec. 29.

That tow line snapped about five hours later, and then a mooring line was used to continue the tow. But that line also broke a few hours later, and another mooring line was attached.

On Dec. 30 at about 3:40 a.m., that line broke. A third mooring line was then attached to HMCS Athabaskan to return it to Sydney.

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DND Penelized after 2011 Fuel Spill from Preserver

DND was fined 1$ and mandated to donate $20,000 to the Coastal Research Network and $7,500 to the Environmental Damages Fund as punishment for a March 2011 Spill, while fueling at Imperial Oil. Aprox 14,000 litres of marine diesel fuel was discharged, but caused no damage to the shore or Wildlife.

A Technical investigation conducted by the military determined the spill was caused by a defective valve on the supply ship’s grey-water line, a waste discharge pipe that runs through the main fuel tank. Once the vessel’s fuel tank was loaded to the point that the valve on the waste discharge pipe was submerged, the diesel fuel flowed into that line through the valve and was discharged overboard.

The Preserver had just been returned to the navy from a work period at Halifax shipyard, where repairs were made to the valve assembly running through the tank.

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John 1 Ridding out the Storm in Argentia


The John 1 is still tied up in Argentia while crews asses damage and decide what to do. The earl grey has departed Argentia and returning back to ice patrol 


The Ryan Leet and Atlantic Fir are still on stand by due to the storm system. The Atlantic Fir was asked to push the John 1 against the dock to relive the mooring lines. (Photo top)

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Various Mechanical Issues.

its been a bad week for Bulk Carries and Mechanical issues.

1. The John 1 Lost power and went aground off Rose Blanche Newfoundland.

2. The Rt Hon Paul E Martin Waited out weather in the outer Anchorage before proceeding  to Shelbourn Ship Repair with the tug Atlantic Fir with a drive issue.

3. The Bulker Pioneer arrived at National Gypsum, appeared to load cargo, and On Friday was cold moved to Pier 25, with her bow Heavily ballasted down. This morning she appears to have propeller  work going on.

 (Above) Work On Pioneers Propeller (Below) Pioneer Ballasted down forward.

4. the Bulker Persenk Arrived to repair Ice damage at Anchorage 7. Her propeller was bent causing a bad vibration. Divers removed pieces to re-balance it.

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John 1 aground off Newfoundland

The 600′ bulk carrier M/V John 1 went aground ~1.6KM from the community of Rose Blanche Newfoundland this afternoon just after 1330. 23 crew were evacuated by helicopter after issue ing a distress call.

One assumes they will attemp to tow the vessel off the rocks next high tide. The forcast looks stable though winds are expected to pick up Monday morning.
DFO reports the John 1 lost power on Friday and was drifting parallel to the coast. CCGS Earl Grey was dispatched and tug Ryan Leet was hired from mulgrave to assist and was due Saturday. Reports are that the crew stated there was water in the engine room, which could explain the power loss. 
Saturday morning wind changes put the ship in danger of running aground. Earl Grey was unable to establish a tow, and the ship grounded. A helicopter was dispatched from gander to pick up the crew. The CCGS Pierre Radison is also due on scene.

John 1 was built in 1991 and is registered in panama. She was due in Montreal having sailed from Las Palmas. The port of Montreal listed the grain elevator as her birth, so we can assume she was due to load grain for export, and is currently unloaded.
Photo top  by Mary Hardy via Facebook http://t.co/APtxPr5L5u  below JRCC via Twitter
Additional photos below by Rolland Kettle

UPDATE: 04/16 AIS indicates the Tug Ryan Leet arrived on scene around 1430 ADT. She sailed from Mulgrave just after 0700 saturday, and reportedly was slowed by ice. (Below File photo of Ryan Leet)

The transportation Safety Board also announced they are sending investigators to the scene of the grounding.

UPDATE 04/17: The owners have contracted Svitzer  to salvage the vessel. Svitzer has 3 tugs in Port Hawksbury (Point Chebucto, Svitzer Bedford and Point Valiant, all formerly based in Halifax) though they will likely retain the Ryan Leet as she is more powerful. The Coast Guard is amassing pollution control assets in Rose Blanche.

Photos below By Rolland Kettle:

UPDATE: Shifting winds Caused the John 1 to become free overnight Sunday and  she is now securely at anchor. Attempts to pull the John 1 from the shoal by the tug Ryan Leet were suspended Sunday due to deteriorating weather and sea conditions. The Slvage team will board the vessle to perform an assessment once conditions improve.

UPDATE 03/18:
Salvage crews arrived and boarded the John 1. She will be towed by Ryan Leet and Atlantic Fir to Argentia for further assessment. No pollution has been detected, though ccgs Earl Grey will follow along with pollution control gear.
(Below)Salvage crew boarding the MV John I. — Department of Fisheries and Oceans photo

UPDATE 03/19:

Preparations to tow are underway. A generator will be brought to the john 1 to power the anchor winches. Tow cables have already been connected. Once the tow commences the crew will follow aboard the earl grey.

UPDATE 03/20:
The following photo was provided to me. The tow is now underway.

 I have been informed that the tow is progressing nicely making 7 knots. Eta is 0800 Saturday 

UPDATE 03/21:

Overnight The tow  headed for shelter behind St. Pierre due to weather conditions. Weather permitting it should be heading back on course some time Friday.

The tow resumed just after noon with improved weather. Currently making 5 knots south of St Pierre
UPDATE 03/22:
Tow is now in the traffic lanes awaiting a pilot for Argentia.

Now handing off tow to Atlantic Fir and North Atlantic Osprey

Now getting lines on the dock

UPDATE 03/23;

The Ryan Leet ,Atlantic Fir and CCGS Earl Grey are tied up in Argentia. The John 1 is under going diver survey and assessment, the Ryan Leet and Atlantic Fir are standing by until Sivzters Salvage team makes a decision on where the John 1 is going and how it will get there.

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Radioactive leak at Fairview Cove

 Last night, around Quarter to 10, Halifax Fire received a Call about a hazardous material Spill at Fairview Cove. It Now appears that a container containing  uranium tetrachloride cylinders failed while being unloaded from the Atlantic Companion resulting in the cylinders being dropped on the ship.

Radiation levels three times the acceptable amount have been detected. Halifax fire later clarified that there was no material Leaking, but elevated radiation  levels existed. Workers were released at 1am. I have now been informed that Fairview is closed until Monday morning for cleanup. A specialist cleanup team is due to arrive from Toronto this afternoon.

(Left)this is the type of container that failed.  I believe this one safely came off Atlantic companion earlier. Its more of a bulkhead flat then Container, and holds the 4 cylinders. Note the abundance of Hazmat labels on the sides. The top one is Radioactive.

These bulkhead flats are frequently used to ship Vehicles and other odd sized and shaped cargos on container vessels.

From Transport Canada offers the following Health notes should the cylinder fail
  • Radiation presents minimal risk to transport workers, emergency response personnel and the public during transportation accidents. Packaging durability increases as potential radiation and criticality hazards of the content increase.
  • Chemical hazard greatly exceeds radiation hazard.
  • Substance reacts with water and water vapor in air to form toxic and corrosive hydrogen fluoride gas and an extremely irritating and corrosive, white-colored, water-soluble residue.
  • If inhaled, may be fatal.
  • Direct contact causes burns to skin, eyes, and respiratory tract.
  • Low-level radioactive material; very low radiation hazard to people.
  • Runoff from control of cargo fire may cause low-level pollution.

Small spills suggest 100m exclusion zone

Original Reports:
 the area below was generated as details were unfolding:

Reports are that Halifax fire is dealing with a leaking container at Fairview cove. Atlantic Companion and London Express are both at the pier. Fire received the call at 21:46

A witness has told me that the fire department is by the Atlantic Companion. The container is reportedly damaged though May not be leaking.

Reportedly the commodity is Uranium Hexofloride, which wikipedia describes as “highly toxic, reacts violently with water and is corrosive to most metals”
Update:
Halifax fire confirm the container had uranium tetrachloride inside. The container was dropped on the ship and not on the pier.
Fire Crews confirm container is breached, levels three times the acceptable amount have been detected. Halifax fire later clarified that there was no breach, but elevated levels existed.
A source on site indicates that the container dropped off the crane. Workers have been told to report back at midnight  though federal nuclear authorities have been contacted. The workers were sent home around 1am
Longshoreman and ships crew near the dropped container are reportedly under quarantine. This is likely due to the potential toxic effects of the product. They were also released at 1am
Fire have requested a metro transit bus which will be used for evacuations. Nuclear safety teams are Apprently due around 0800 tommorow, now requiring longer term accommodations then the bus.
Workers are being scanned for radiation and released. Sounds like fire units are also returning to base. Halifax fire confirmed that there are no injuries an no persons are contaminated. no evacuations are required. They report that 4 cylinders fell from a container but did not rupture. This might suggest that the container failed rather then the container falling from the crane, which has now been confirmed to be the case
About the material
From transport canada 
  • Radiation presents minimal risk to transport workers, emergency response personnel and the public during transportation accidents. Packaging durability increases as potential radiation and criticality hazards of the content increase.
  • Chemical hazard greatly exceeds radiation hazard.
  • Substance reacts with water and water vapor in air to form toxic and corrosive hydrogen fluoride gas and an extremely irritating and corrosive, white-colored, water-soluble residue.
  • If inhaled, may be fatal.
  • Direct contact causes burns to skin, eyes, and respiratory tract.
  • Low-level radioactive material; very low radiation hazard to people.
  • Runoff from control of cargo fire may cause low-level pollution.

Small spills suggest 100m exclusion zone
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RFP For MV Miner Removal

The province of Nova Scotia is requesting proposals to remove the wreck of the MV Miner. The request for proposals (RFP) was posted today, March 12, on the provincial procurement site.

The RFP will be posted for six weeks with a deadline of April 23 at 2:15 pm.

Interested applicants can submit proposals by following instructions outlined in the RFP. Once the deadline is passed, applications will be reviewed and an award will be made within four weeks.

The RFP can be found at http://novascotia.ca/tenders/tenders/tender-details.aspx?id=NSLANDS63 .

The RFP itself is 312 pages – mostly of environmental disclosures, and a summary of woork undertaken to date. It also includes severl photgraphs of the vessel, including the ones seen here.

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