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Esperanza Real

The Esperanza Real, Tied up in Lunenburg, with a Newfoundland crew aboard. The vessel appears to be headed elsewhere for conversion.

The vessel was built in 1969 as Lady Janice in Georgetown, PEI. She operated as Winchester in the Newfoundland Coastal trade as a Ferry/cargo vessel, and was recently sold by her owner Ray Berkshire LTD of Arnold’s Cove, Newfoundland.

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Before and After

 Fishing Trawlers end up getting converted to all sorts of stuff. Take Cape Chidley. Built in Pictou in 1976 as the Esther Boyd for Canso Seafood, She fished until 2001, and was laid up in Lunenburg in 2009. Her Surveyed market price was $225,000us.

She evidently found a Buyer, As she is now the M/Y Yacht Hop, and configured as a transport yacht from the Caribbean to French Riviera by a Frenchman.

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Halifax Shipyard’s Graving Dock now a National Historic Civil Engineering Site

Today the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE) officially designated the Halifax Shipyard’s Graving Dock as a National Historic Civil Engineering Site. Now owned by Irving Shipbuilding, the large dry dock was constructed in the 1880s for shipbuilding and repairs. It has functioned during two World Wars and is still serving the industry today. According to the CSCE’s Program of Designation, the 173-metre-long and 24-metre-wide graving dock is a remarkable engineering accomplishment: at 125 years old it is still performing, essentially according to its original design. At the time of its construction, it was the largest dry dock on the Eastern Seaboard and could handle the world’s largest vessels.

The Graving Dock remains a critical part of Irving Shipbuilding’s operation to this day.  Currently in dock is HMCS St. John’s, one of the Canadian Navy’s Halifax-Class frigates.  Originally Irving-built at Saint John Shipbuilding, seven of these ships are now in the midst of a refit program.  It can take anywhere from 12 – 18 months to complete each ship.  The program began in 2011 and will continue into 2017.

It is fitting that the Graving Dock has been recognized for its significance from a historical civil engineering stand-point.  It has survived the Halifax Explosion, several World Wars, and the inevitable advancement of the industry from wooden to steel ships as well as the exponential growth in vessel size and weight.  It helped repair several thousand ships during World War II and now is the repair site for our Navy’s current combatant fleet, in the very shipyard that will construct the Navy’s new combatant fleet beginning in 2015.

The Ocean terminals At pier 20 are also Registered as a National Historic Civil Engineering Site

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Amistad in Lunenburg

The Tall Ship Amistad arrived in Lunenburg this afternoon. She is built as a replica of the Slave ship Amistad Circa 1780.

She is in town for the filming of the TV mini series Book of Negro’s, which will happen in Lunenburg and Shelburne, with sailing in between. A coasting trade licence was required, and Was requested for the period between May 2 and May 18.

(File Photo)

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Odd Ship Tied up in Sheet Harbour.

The E-ship 1 Delivered Windmill parts to Sheet Harbour This past weekend. The Vessel is rather unique as it is propelled by the wind. Her first voyage was in 2010. The ship is owned by the third-largest wind turbine manufacturer, Germany’s Enercon GmbH and is used to transport wind turbine components.

The E-Ship 1 is a Flettner ship: four large rotorsails that rise from its deck are rotated by the ship’s engines. The sails, or Flettner rotors, aid the ship’s propulsion by means of the Magnus effect — the perpendicular force that is exerted on a spinning body moving through a fluid stream.

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