Port Expansion Feedback is in

Halterm North proposal

The port released the results of the public consultation they performed to solicit feedback on port expansion and how the port operates within the community. The consultation was conducted by Hill+Knowlton Strategies via a survey to two groups in March and April 2019.   

Support for port is strong, with the majority from both groups agreeing or strongly agreeing that the port is important to the economy and quality of life in the region. Among the groups, the rational for port expansion is understood, and is supported by similar numbers of respondents.  

We covered the examined options for port expansion in January

Despite some strong advocacy for moving Halterm to Dartmouth, survey respondents favored the Halterm North expansion option over the move. Halterm North would see the south end finger piers that make up the ocean terminals infilled to add an additional berth. More than 50% of respondents were indifferent or against moving to Dartmouth. Less than 31% were indifferent or against Halterm expansion.  

The respondents indicated their priority considerations regarding port expansion were the impact on local neighborhoods, and access to road and Rail. On the question of truck volume downtown, most felt it was an issue, and there was strong support for reducing trucks, and expanding rail to do so.  

The survey results are good news for the port. The port has some clear direction, and support from the public. Expansion can be done, but the port must also be a good neighbour. The recent announcement on federal funding to remove trucks from the downtown and enhancing rail service between the terminals was likely driven by the port and the government taking survey feedback in this regard seriously.  

The Consultation consisted of two survey groups. The open group consisted of anyone who wanted to fill out the survey online. 1,911 answered some or all the survey questions. The majority of this group were working age, and 23% identified as a downtown commuter. A second group, was a demographically representative sample of 1012 participants from across the province. 33% of this group was retired, and the age group tended to skew to age 45+. It was also 50% of HRM and 50% from the province at large. 

As would be expected, responses to the open survey were likely from interested parties, but the results among both groups show the same preferences overall. 

Full results, and the expansion options can be viewed at www.portcityhfx.ca  

CMA-CGM Thames

The CMA-CGM Thames put in to pier 41 Saturday afternoon. the strong breeze had the vessel take 3 tugs to spin it around and back it into its birth.

though not the largest container ships to call in Halifax, CMA-CGM Thames and her class mates are the only vessels to have the forward bridge arrangement. Maersk Patras Was being worked at Pier 42.

Bridges at Fairview Cove

Saturday brought two K-line vessels to Fairview Cove.

At the West end, Granville Bridge was worked first. The East end was occupied by George Washington Bridge (below), which took on crane units as they finished on the Granville Bridge. the ships were built in 2005/2006, and are rated for 5642 TEU.

Both ships are working the EC5 Service, with George Washington Bridge running Westbound, and Granville bridge Sailing east.

Halterm Expansion Update

It appears that the first block of the pier 42 expansion is complete, and work has started on the second. paint markings seem to indicate the new block is 22m in height, about 70′.

the blocks are slipformed, and once complete, will be towed into place and sunk. they will then be filled with aggregate to hold them in place, and capped with the pier top.

First Ferry’s First refit.

The Dartmouth Ferry Christopher Stannix is going in for its 5 year refit. The city issued the tender today. The Christopher Stannix entered service in 2014, and is the first of the 5 newbuilds.

The scope of work is mostly Painting and General repair work plus inspections. there are also a few modifications to match features of the newer boats. Of particular interest to users – The back angle on the benches is being fixed, so they will not so reclined

New fender, shown in green

Interestingly, An additional fender is being added, which requires removing some ballast. the current ballast consists of 273 concrete blocks (2.19 MT) held in place with ratchet straps. and must be reduced to 181 concrete blocks (1.45 MT)

Bella Vita – Big Yacht

The Bella Vita spent a few days at tall ships Quay, before sailing for Lunenburg Saturday Morning. At 255′ in length, she is the largest purpose built yacht to call in Halifax. The largest yacht to Call in Halifax was the Lone Ranger, which then belonged to a google co-founder, and converted from a ocean going tug.

Bella Vita was reportedly owned by John Risley of Clearwater seafood fame, though it is now available for charter for $640,000us/week +fuel and food.

Most yachts that call in Halifax are in the 130′ range or smaller, though some of the sailing yachts have reached 180′

Baie St. Paul departs National Gypsum

The Baie St. Paul made its first call to Halifax, Loading Gypsum for Cote Ste. Catherine in Quebec. The ship sailed just after 1400 on Sunday.

Baie St Paul is the first of 4 trillium Class Geared Bulkers, and was completed in China in 2012. CSL Also built 6 new panamax Trillum Class Ships for its Americas fleet, though they are built like traditional ocean going bulkers, and lack the seawaymax form of the Lakers. 2 additional trillium class lakers were built without the self unloading gear.

Though built in China, the ships were not built for ocean voyages, and arrived with temporary reinforcing that was removed on arrival to Canada. Baie St. Paul had additional reinforcing added during last winters layup to allow it perform coastal work. – Previous CSL Lakers were common callers in Halifax, Particularly Atlantic Huron and Salarium

Halterm Pier Expansion Update

Work on the Halterm Expansion has moved to Pier 9. Dredging was completed at pier 9 Mid may, and the dump scows have been used to prepare the sea bed with coarse gravel loaded at pier 9. the Slip forming equipment is also now on site, and the first forms are being placed on the barge (above left). once the floor is cast, the outside walls and interior dividers will be cast by slip forming until the entire block is constructed. Once complete, it will be towed into place, and filler with gravel.

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