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Container Terminal Moving to Dartmouth? probably not.

I was recently quoted in a CBC Article by Paul Withers. I thought it would be a good idea to flesh out some of the thoughts in that article.

The Port authority has announced that it is undertaking a study looking at relocating one of the container terminals. They haven’t said which one. they also made comments suggesting they want to alleviate downtown trucks. This leads everyone to think the Southend terminal is moving to Dartmouth.

I think this is an unlikely scenario. The South End Terminal consists of the Halifax Ocean Terminals (Piers 20-35) And Halterm (Piers 36-42) Besides numerous transit sheds, the south end facility is also home to the grain elevator. It already has deep water, and is unencumbered by bridges. It seems unlikely that the port authority would relocate Halterm, leaving the rest of the facility there. recall that the main goal is to accommodate bigger ships concurrently. Even as a pure real estate play – the coming of availability of land from the cogswell interchange would make it seem that prospects for development would be offset for a number of years.

More likely is that Fairview Cove closes. Its big constraint for this terminal is the bridges – already the largest ships calling on halifax cant pass underneath at high tide – or on westbound legs when they are carrying mostly empties. The Macdonald is being Raised as part of the big lift, however the Mackay will remain at the same height until it needs redecking. There are also stories that Ceres wants to terminate the lease early – which suggests they see the writing on the wall.

A move to Dartmouth is problematic. Any new facility would need to be constructed from scratch on Infill. There is not currently sufficient rail capacity to accommodate trains there, and the logical place to build such a terminal is where the imperial oil docks currently are – and they are unlikely to go anywhere. Anywhere else would likely run afoul of the neighbors.

I suspect the best option will be another extension of Pier 42, or extending pier B further into the Harbour. As for the truck issue, I would suggest that the city build the planned, but never built Northwest Arm bridge, and highway connection to the 103 as a transit and Truck route only. this would solve the problem of getting buses from Spryfield, Tantalon and Timberlea onto the peninsula bypassing traffic choke points, and remove trucks from downtown. Trucks could exit into the railcut to access the port from Robie street, and could be subject to a toll to fund the road. Busses could connect to Robie.

 

 

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NYK, MOL and K Line to merge container businesses

The three large Japanese shipping companies have announced they will merge their container lines into a new firm, which will be the 7th largest. NYK currently calls on Halifax as part of the G6 alliance. MOL and K-Line stopped calling in 2011 when their shared service ended service to Halifax.

With the recent bankruptcy of Hanjin, and CMA-CGM’s acquisition of NOL, and the termination and creation of alliances  there will be lots of change coming in the next year.

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Constructing the Halifax Ocean Terminals.

Recently there have been Suggestions that the Halifax Ocean Terminals Move to the Dartmouth shore, where the refinery currently is. This is problematic, as the tank farm and moorings are still in use by Imperial Oil for their terminal operation, and Irving has recently rebuilt its facilities to gain independence from the shared facilities it was using with imperial oil.

With that said, its worth a look at the construction of the Ocean Terminals.

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The Ocean Terminals were built in the south end of the city, close to the mouth of the harbour, and were meant to be new, modern and larger port facilities for Halifax. It was quite the civil engineering feat. The project was for the construction of what we know today as Piers 20-28, the railway cut, and port facilities.

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callfortenders Halifax for a while dominated as Canada’s East Coast port, but poor railway access made it too distant; and antiquated methods, unprofitable. In 1910, improvements were made to Pier 2 at the deep water terminus in the north end, however it was constrained by space available to it. Wharves, private residences and businesses had encroached, and there was no longer space for railway expansion. In 1912, the Dominion Government decided to proceed with the Ocean Terminals project.

Though expected to be much larger, the initial project called for the construction of the passenger terminal, interconnected with the rail terminal, as well as Pier A, and the breakwater. The requirements were for 45′ depth.

 

 

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The construction contract was held by Foley Bros, Welsh, Stewart & Fauquier. James Macgregor was the Superintending Engineer, responsible for design and construction for the Canadian Government.

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Though Halifax is known for having a deep natural channel, the piers were located close to shore; in places, in as little as 10 feet of water, and so required substantial dredging.  250,000 cubic yards of material was removed to ensure the required 45′ depth was met. As well, stable foundations would be required for the piers.  The area would be drilled, charges set, and then the rock excavated. Most of the rock was excavated by the Canadian government’s 12yd dipper dredge “Cynthia”, though deeper areas were done with a Marion Dragline scraper on a barge fitted with an orange peel bucket. This crane was intended to be used for block placement, but proved versatile.

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The pier was to be constructed from 3647 sixty-ton Concrete blocks would then be stacked to form the pier face, and then after placement filled with sand rocks and concrete. The area within would then be filled. The blocks were 31′ wide, 22’long and 4’tall. They were cast on site, and stored until they were required to be placed. Though this method was not new, it was to date the largest construction using this method. the Recent Pier 9D was also constructed with a similar method.

ot1A concrete batch plant was setup on site, and the blocks were produced using a forming system. Most of the blocks were identical, so they could be easily mass produced.

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The blocks were cast on site and stored until needed. When they were required, a 100ton crane would pick up the block, take it to the end of the pier and lower it into place. the blocks were cast with keys to ensure they aligned properly when placed. blocklaywallsec

The breakwater was constructed with rock removed from the railcut. Loads of rock would be pushed out on railcars to the end of the breakwater, then across a plate girder bridge, and onto a barge. They would then be dumped. The barge was kept level in the tides by adjusting ballast. As the pier extended,  the barge would be moved further along until the required 1500′ was constructed.
STR27926a.001.aa.csOnce the piers were built, additional Facilities could be constructed. Pier A featured a sizeable freight shed, and the Terminal Shed at pier 21 was completed for handling passengers.

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The Shed above was constructed on Pier A.

Pier A-1, with Births 30-34 was constructed in the 60’s

Pier B, which now houses Piers 36-39, and is now part of Halterm was constructed in the 30’s
Halterm itself Births 41 and 42, opened in 1970. It occupies birth 40 on Pier B.

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Iroquois to be scrapped.

R.J. MacIsaac Ltd. has been awarded a 10.8 million dollar contract for the Disposal of HMCS Iroquois. The company is currently under contract to dismantle former HMCS Protecteur and Algonquin. Both those ships were towed to Brooklyn from Esquimalt, B.C.

Iroquois was decommissioned last Summer. The Scrapping contract is to be completed within 18months. There was some speculation that she may become a museum ship in Quebec, though that was thought to be in bad shape. Hopefully Athabaskan will be saved when she is finally decommissioned.

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Sunday Cruise Ships.

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Norwegian Dawn Tied up at pier 22. Shes running a 7 Day 7-Day Canada & New England cruise from Boston and ending in Quebec. She then does the return trip.

A late arrival and departure yesterday was the Seven Seas Mariner. Shes on a Repositioning trip a 28 Nights trip from San Francisco to Montréal via the Panama Canal.

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HMCS St John’s on the Synchro Lift

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In an event that hasen’t happened since at least 2008, A non Submarine is occupying the dockyard synchrolift.

HMCS St Johns is undergoing pre-deployment maintenance, and the Graving dock at Halifax shipyard is currently unavailable. This also gives a chance to clearly see the below waterline goings ons. – model makers take note!

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Help Support Easter Seals NS.

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Easter Seals NS is a Non-profit Registered charity that provides services promoting mobility, inclusion, and independence for Nova Scotians with disabilities. These include employment programs, Summer Camps for Disabled Kids, Mobility Equipment assistance. They do good work.

Easter seals NS holds an annual Fundraising Event called the Drop Zone. In Exchange for raising Funds, Participants Repel down the side of the Third Tallest Building in Halifax. For the past 5 years, A co-worker of mine has been raising money for this Event. For the Past 2 years, We had an Office team, and I would Photograph them on the way down. (You can see last year’s photos Here https://www.flickr.com/photos/hfxshippingnews/albums/72157659020729886 )Easter seals has also used some of these photos on social media and in print to Promote the event. This year, the office team has retired, or been told that they can’t do it again by their wives. As a result, Ive been asked to join last minute.

Did I mention I don’t like Heights.

I’ve chosen to undertake a Small challenge in order to benefit those who face challenges every day of their lives. I’ve set a very modest fundraising goal of 250$. I would appreciate your support. You can donate at https://easterseals.akaraisin.com/Pledge/Participant/Home.aspx?seid=12291&mid=9&pid=2935142 A tax receipt will be issued for all donations of $15.00 or more.

 

DONATE Here!

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