Category Archives: bulker

2 ships collide in Welland Canal.

CHCH News in Hamilton interviewed me yesterday via Facetime about my thoughts on the collision between the Alanis and Florence Spirit in the Welland Canal which occurred July 11th. The Canal, and entire lakes shipping industry got lucky that neither ship sunk. You can see the interview here.

The collision was caught by at least two individuals who were out watching ships. the two video’s of the collision are included below. both of these videos were pretty promptly posted to Social Media.

in what was likely a steering failure, the general cargo ship Alanis loaded with wind turbine parts bound for Cleveland, and the bulker Florence Spirit, Port Colburn for Grand Anse PQ collided. It looks as though the Florence Spirit crossed the channel in front of the Alanis, in the video an alarm can be heard sounding prior to the collision.

The Welland Canal. the Collision occurred just above the current location of the Florence Spirit.

had the Florence Spirit sunk, across the canal, it could have taken weeks or months to clear the vessel. Photos of the Florence Spirit taken after the collision show it listing and down in the bow, suggesting that the hull was punctured by the Bulbous bow of the Alanis.

Despite Pilots being aboard the vessel, they can do little in the case of a machinery issue. a blockage in the canal would trap ships on both sides of the canal, and would have major trade impacts due to the quantities of bulk product that moves through the canal, including Grain and Iron Ore. Perhaps its time to consider compulsory tugs for vessels transiting the canal.

The Welland Canal is located in Ontario. The 43 km passage is part of the St. Lawrence Seaway system, connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Erie through the Niagara Peninsula. It enables ships to bypass the Niagara Falls.

Approximately 40million tonnes of cargo are carried through the Canal each year by some 3,000 vessels,of various types. These vessels are comprised of ocean-going vessels, along with Canadian and U.S. lakers.

Federal Mosel at anchor

Fednav bulker Federal Mosel is sitting at anchor in the inner Harbour.

the ship sailed from Thunder Bay via Port Cartier PQ, and appears to be loaded with grain for export. Built in China in 2017, the ship is on long term charter to fednav. It is unclear why the ship has stopped in Halifax.

CSL Tacoma

CSL Tacoma spent a few days at anchor in the basin, before moving to pier 27 this morning, presumably to take on bunkers. The ship moved to National Gypsum this Afternoon.

Wood Chip Carrier Mcqueen

floating very high out of the water, the empty wood ship carrier Mcqueen took the inner anchorage for Asian Gypsy moth inspection. Mcqueen sailed from Dafeng China February 23. the ship is due to sail mid afternoon.

Built in 2009 in Japan as Ocean Destiny, the ship took its current name in 2016. it is owned by Hope Well Shipping, based in Shandong.

UPDATE: on departure, the Ship gave Belledune NB as its destination.

First Ship of 2020

with no movements into or out of the harbour, since the Ethan sailed yesterday at noon, the First ship of 2019 looks to be the Algoma Verity, due at the pilot at 6:30pm tonight, bound for National Gypsum.

UPDATE 7:25pm: Algoma Verity has twice delayed its arrival, and is now due at 7am tomorrow. the car carrier MEDITERRANEAN HIGHWAY is due at 5:30am, bound for autoport, and will now likely be the first arrival of the New Year. there was one departure today – the tug Spitfire III bound for Saint John.

Baie St. Paul departs National Gypsum

The Baie St. Paul made its first call to Halifax, Loading Gypsum for Cote Ste. Catherine in Quebec. The ship sailed just after 1400 on Sunday.

Baie St Paul is the first of 4 trillium Class Geared Bulkers, and was completed in China in 2012. CSL Also built 6 new panamax Trillum Class Ships for its Americas fleet, though they are built like traditional ocean going bulkers, and lack the seawaymax form of the Lakers. 2 additional trillium class lakers were built without the self unloading gear.

Though built in China, the ships were not built for ocean voyages, and arrived with temporary reinforcing that was removed on arrival to Canada. Baie St. Paul had additional reinforcing added during last winters layup to allow it perform coastal work. – Previous CSL Lakers were common callers in Halifax, Particularly Atlantic Huron and Salarium

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