Monthly Archives: December 2018

Augusta Sun for Nirint

Augusta Sun has spent the last week tied up at Pier 28, likely unloading Nickle from Cuba. She is due to sail later this afternoon. Curiously, she seems to be lacking a load of containers on the deck, which is normal for Nirint’s service.

Onego Trader lies behind her, at pier 27, likely with a load of rail for CN.

Onego Trader, File photo from 2013


Horizon detained and deficient

horizon at pier 9

The bulk carrier Horizon spent the weekend tied up at pier 9, where she took on fuel from at least 5 tractor trailers. 

Horizon appeared to be  empty, and arrived from Port Alfred in Quebec, where she had failed a Port State Inspection, and had been detained for 5 days. She was released to sail for a US Gulf Shipyard for repairs, stopping in Halifax for Fuel.

At the time of inspection, 22 Deficiencies were noted, 9 of which were severe enough to detain the ship. Among the detainable deficiencies, there were issues with the lifeboats, improper visibility for the bridge, problems with water tight openings, the rudder angle indicator didn’t work, nor was the magnetic compass readable, and the general alarm was inadequate.

The other deficiencies included failure to comply with labor standards, an overheated cold storage,  issues with the galley, water supply, sickbay, and improper paperwork.


Horizon Enabler for cable work.

Horizon maritime of Dartmouth registered the multifunction offshore support vessel Horizon Enabler on November 21. The former Tidewater Enabler was built by STX Offshore of Norway in 2010, and had been on charter to Horizon Maritime since August. The ship was recently involved with the removal of oil form the sunken Manolis L for the Coast Guard.

The ship arrived at pier 9 in Halifax December 4th, and will be doing work on a sub sea cable off the Magdalen Islands. She spent today on trials in the basin.

The ship joins Horizon Star as the second ship owned by Horizon though they currently operate several other Tidewater vessels on Charter.

Feds buy 8 more Bay Class Lifeboats for CCGS

The Feds are acquiring eight new high-endurance search and rescue (SAR) lifeboats for the Coast Guard. the boats will be purchased from Chantier Naval Forillon of Gaspé, Quebec, and Hike Metal Products of Wheatley, Ontario.

Chantier Naval Forillon and Hike Metal Products were already producing six SAR lifeboats each under existing contracts signed in 2015. Under the amended contracts, each shipyard will build four additional lifeboats at a total cost of $61,757,896. These contracts were awarded under the small vessel component of the National Shipbuilding Strategy and will help maintain well-paying, middle-class jobs at both shipyards.

With the ability to operate up to 100 nautical miles from shore, these new high-endurance SAR lifeboats are enhancing the Coast Guard’s search and rescue capabilities. Vessels from this class are named after bays in Canada and are being built under the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Fleet Renewal Plan and Oceans Protection Plan.

CSS Acadia finally getting repairs.

Today the province announced repair work on the CSS Acadia. From the Release:

The Provencal Government is making repairs to the only vessel still afloat to have survived the Halifax Explosion, the historic CSS Acadia.

The CSS Acadia is a national historic site that is permanently moored at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax. The 105-year-old steel-hulled ship also served in the Royal Canadian Navy during both World Wars.

Restoration work that is necessary to preserve the CSS Acadia will include repair of the deck and sub-deck and drydocking the vessel to repair the hull, electrical systems and ballast tank.

No word on the cost estimate, or who will be doing the work. I believe the only available facility in Nova Scotia able to accommodate the Acadia would be shelburne ship repair.

No tender notice has yet been posted, nor has a time line for the work.

Halterm Expansion Underway

The expansion of Halterm is underway, with Ocean Construction removing the walkway from the existing pier. The new Caseons will butt up against the back, widening the pier, as well as extending it Seaward.

McNally construction appears to have won the dredging tender, as their tugs and scows have been arriving in town the past week.

CN makes offer to buy Halterm

CN Rail’s CEO told the financial post on Wednesday that it made an offer to buy Halterm from Macquarie Infrastructure. Macquarie Infrastructure bought the terminal in 2007 for 173 million.

CN wants to tern Halterm into the Prince Rupert of the east coast, and attempt to lure traffic from New York. CN’s rail network reaches extensively into the US, and has port access in the Gulf of Mexico.

this is the best possible terminal operator for halifax, is they want to fill their trains, and have the ability to market the terminal and lure new customers here.

Warship design flaws and other news #28

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News

1. This week in the Herald


I talk about the sunken Norwegian frigate, and its implications for the CSC

2. More CSC Flaws?
Post media is reporting that DND has concerns about the type 26 potentially having power and propulsion problems due to similarities with the British type 45 – which has issues.

3. Raising the sunken frigate
Naval today has an illustrated guide to warship salvage. – or How they will raise the Sunken Norwegian Frigate. In typical European fashion, they will use a large crane.

4. Private SAR Helicopters?
Private SAR helicopters are a possibility – and frankly a good idea to augment CAF service.

Interesting

1.Shipspotting in Vancouver.
I love this infographic for the Port of Vancouver. BTW, our shipspotting 101 series goes into way more detail on various types of ships that call in Halifax.

History

Dec 4, 1933 – Leading Seaman John Pully from HMCS SAGUENAY is buried at sea following his death on 30 November 1933 from leukemia. His burial off Halifax is considered the RCN’s first burial at sea.

Dec 3, 1969 – During HMCS BONAVENTURE’s final cruise, 2 sailors died when they entered an AVGAS tank that was not fully vented, 2 sailors that attempted to save their shipmates were also killed.

Dec 2, 2000 – HMCS VICTORIA (ex HMS UNSEEN), is commissions into the RCN as 1st of four Victoria class submarines


Nov 30, 1835 – Mark Twain, was born in Florida, MI. He worked as a pilot on Mississippi steamboats before becoming a writer. Mark Twain is a pen name, taken from a command used while sounding the river with a lead line.

Nov 28,1787 – Bligh departs spithead on his fateful voyage abroad the bounty.

The case for some contract SAR services

RCAF Cormorant – AKA the EH-101. used for SAR Services in Canada.

Today’s Herald features a piece by Andrea Gunn about the possibility of civilian contractors filling gaps in SAR service. One of those gaps is the short summer season in the arctic.

To date, the government has resisted stationing a helicopter in the arctic during the summer shipping season. They have claimed that this would be removing resources from other areas, and their simply isn’t the need for it in the north.

Cougar S-92 lowering a SAR Tech. Cougar Photo.

Given the relatively short summer season, Helicopter SAR services could be provided on a contract basis. Cougar Helicopters, who fly out of Halifax and St. John’s are able to provide contract all weather rescue services using S-92 Helicopters – the civilian version of the Air Force’s new Cyclone Helicopters. Cougar Helicopters offers this service commercially now, and regularly practices off Halifax.

RCAF Cyclone – the military version of the S-92

Nunatsiaq news reported that the much vaunted deep water Naval Station at Nanivsk, announced under the Harper Government, and has been slow to materialize – Construction started in 2015, and is due to be completed next summer. The port will serve as a re supply base for navy and Coast guard vessels.  It would be a logical place to station Sar Assets.

The case of the grounding of the Akademik Ioffe shows how vitally important it, and SAR helicopter service is to the arctic. Two Helicopters were dispatched from central Canada, but had long flight times, and required fuel stops. Two other cases show how helicopters are needed in the Arctic

On August 29th, 2 men were rescued after their 11m sailboat “Anahita” became trapped in ice and sunk in the Bellot Straight. The Men were found on a ice flow, with warm clothes, food and water, and a life raft. They were rescued by the coast guard icebreaker Henry Larsen’s helicopter, after the closest ship was delayed due to ice.

Two Inuit hunters were also rescued by the Louis St Laurent helicopter after a polar bear attack.  A 2009 senate report identified increasing numbers of pleasure craft in the arctic as a source of significant risk, along with foreign vessels unsuitable for arctic travel transiting Canadian waters.

Given the constrained supply of SAR Resources in existing areas – contract services should be considered.