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The Last days of the Nova Dock?

The Nova Dock was  moved from the shipyard to Woodside at noon today.

4 Mckiel tugs had  shown up in the past few days, and they appear to be working the Nova Dock. Salvor, Tim Mckeil, Beverly M1 and Lois M are all present, and tied up on the dock, moving it to woodside. the trip left late, at 1pm, and arrived around 6pm.

The Nova Docks Canadian Registry was closed August 18th, And I have been told she has been sold to International Ship Repair of Miami Fl.

The plan is the cut the dock in Half, then tow each half to Florida.
 the dock was built in 2 pieces and assembled on delivery.

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Ships Starting Here AOPS Contract Signed.

  In a technical briefing with media in Ottawa Friday morning, representatives from Public Works Government Services Canada, the Canadian Navy and Irving Shipbuilding provided an overview of the Arctic Offshore Patrol ship program including the ship’s design and capability, the number of ships to be built and the construction schedule.

The Shipyards contract with the government is for six ships. The build contract is valued at $2.3 billion. Should costs increase due to unforeseen factors, the contract will guarantee the delivery of five ships within the same ceiling price ($2.3 billion). Basically the contract is for 5, but if they come in at a good price, they will build 6.

Construction of the first sections of the vessels – known as initial blocks or production test modules – will begin in June. The shipyard will test its new infrastructure, environment and production processes, with these initial blocks. Cutting of steel for the first AOPS ship is on target for September 2015.

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AOPS Has A name

The Government today announced the name of the first of the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS). Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Harry DeWolf, named in honour of a wartime Canadian naval hero, will be the first of a fleet of AOPS designed to better enable the RCN to exercise sovereignty in Canadian waters, including in the Arctic. The Prime Minister made the announcement at His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida, formerly commanded by Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf, which currently serves as a museum ship and is located on the waterfront of Hamilton, Ontario.

Subsequent ships in the class will be named to honour other prominent Canadians who served with the highest distinction and conspicuous gallantry in the service of their country. The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships Class will henceforth be known as the Harry DeWolf Class, with Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Harry DeWolf as the lead ship.

A native of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf (RCN) was decorated for outstanding service throughout his naval career, which included wartime command of His Majesty’s Canadian Ship St. Laurent from 1939-40, for which he was twice the subject of a Mention in Dispatches (a national honour bestowed for distinguished service). Later, his 1943-44 command of His Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida helped that ship gain the reputation as “Fightingest Ship in the RCN,” participated in the sinking of 14 enemy ships, and for which he was again twice the subject of a Mention in Dispatches and awarded both the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Service Cross. A consummate leader both ashore and afloat, his exceptional wartime service was recognized with an appointment as a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and as an Officer of the U.S. Legion of Merit. He was also awarded the Canadian Forces Decoration, soon after its creation, to recognize his good conduct throughout his career. He went on to become a popular and effective postwar Chief of the Naval Staff from 1956 until 1960. 

For the first time in its 104-year history, the RCN will name a class of ships after a prominent Canadian naval figure. Vessels have traditionally been named for cities, rivers and Native tribes.
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The Latest on the Nova Dock

Word is that it will cost $60-70 million to replace the NovaDock. the shipyard is planning to issue the Tender for the replacement dock in Jan 2015 with expected delivery of 2 years from that.
The Yard is selling the Novadock for scrap.
The Current Timeline for AOPS construction starts next July with first plates cut in new facility at Windmill Rd site.  From start of cutting to expected launch will be roughly 2 years which would coincide with the delivery of the new dry dock. The New building will allow more work to be done indoors, so launches will now occur much closer to overall completion. They will also be able to do 2 vessels at once. 
This means the yard will be largely unavailable for commercial service for the next 2 years, until a replacement dock is found. No doubt Davie is thrilled, as they are the logical choice to pick up this work. There is no word on the replacement for the ScotiaDock II, which was announced in 2012.
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Fire on board ship Updated – HMCS St John’s at Halifax Shipyard

Thanks to HRM fire buffs for informing us that halifax crews from university ave were paged out to a ship fire just after noon.

The fire is reported extinguished, and smoke is being cleared. 
Given the location of the crews it’s likely the ship was at the ocean terminals suggesting the Pearl mist or one of the offshore supply vessels.
More to follow as known

Update I was provided with the following info:

at approximately 12noon today light smoke was identified aboard the frigate HMCS St. John’s which is in the yard for a scheduled mid-life refit. Approximately 35 people were working aboard the ship. As a precautionary measure the ship was evacuated. The fire department was called. Initial cause appears to be a pinched electrical line on deck 4 that caused a “hot spot”. Employees extinguished the smoldering area with a fire extinguisher prior to the arrival of the fire department. No person was injured and no damage sustained aboard the ship.

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