Category Archives: AOPS

AOPS #2 loaded onto Barge

AOPS #2 the future HMCS Margaret Brooke was loaded onto the launching barge at the shipyard this afternoon. Based on the schedule of the first ship, the launch will occur in the basin tomorrow, though this is unconfirmed at this point.

UPDATE: Pilot order for the Move to the basin is for 13:00 Tomorrow. timing suggests the actual launch will be after dark tomorrow evening.

AOPS Updates

The Boa Barge 37 was spun around at the shipyard today, in preparation of launching AOPS #2. With 2 coasting trade applications, the barge can be used between Oct 17 and Dec 23. an extension was requested, as the original application ended on Nov 17. The SPMT Transporters are also on site, and assembled.

Finally, word is the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, will begin sea trials this Friday. the ABCO landing craft is also sitting on the pier. its a good looking boat.

AOPS 2 Launch Delayed

the Launch of the Second AOPS has been delayed by at least a month.

In August, Irving Shipbuilding applied for a coasting trade license to use the BoaBarge 37 to launch the ship for a 30 Day period between Oct 18 and Nov 18. ISI has now requested another window Between Nov 25 and Dec 23.

the reason for the delay is unclear, but is unlikely related to the stop work order after a contract worker was killed by sand blasting equipment at the yard in July. The original application was dated July 24.

AOPS Trials

The Atlantic Fir was alongside the Harry DeWolf this evening, holding the ship against the pier. I understand that various propulsion system trials are now underway. Various scuff marks from tugs seem to suggest this is not the first such trial.

Atlantic Fir is finished for now.

AOPS Update

Work Continues on the first ship, with testing under way – the Boat Davit appears to have recently load tested, given the empty bag still hanging from it. some of the construction coverings are coming off, and system testing is under way.

The remote gun mount on the bow of Harry DeWolf

the Launch of the Second ship is Due sometime between October 19 and November 19, based on the Coasting trade application for the use of the Boa Barge. that would suggest the plan is to turn the first ship over to the navy before then.

I suspect the yard is under political pressure to hand the ship over prior to the start of the federal election campaign.

Fleet Renewal for the Coast Guard

Today brought a number of Simultaneous announcements about the Coast Guard.

The Prime Minister Announced in Vancouver an investment of $15.7B to renew the CCGS fleet, investing in up to 18 large ships to be built by Canadian shipyards. The Minister for Nova Scotia announced the 2 rumored AOPS for the Coast Guard at BIO. Those ships are to be built as fisheries patrol vessels. A role it is suited for

From the Release:

The Government of Canada is investing in two new Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships, which will be adapted for the Coast Guard to perform tasks including offshore patrols. These ships will be built by Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax.

The Government of Canada is investing in up to 16 Multi-Purpose Vessels to support a variety of missions, including light icebreaking, environmental response, and offshore search and rescue. These ships will be built by Vancouver Shipyards.

The Government of Canada will also proceed through a competitive process with the design of a new class of smaller ships, the new Mid-Shore Multi-Mission Ship, which would complement the work of the large fleet in shallow areas and deliver mid-shore science activities.

Repairs, refits, and vessel life extension work will be carried out on the existing fleet until the new ships are delivered, with over $2 billion to be invested on a competitive basis for this purpose.In addition to funding for shipbuilding, the Government of Canada is also providing over $351 million to support ongoing Canadian Coast Guard capacity enhancements such as strengthening management oversight and promoting innovation and greener practices.

CCGS Ann Harvey one of the Type 1100 muti-purpose light icebreakers currently in use.

So besides the 2 AOPS – they are committing to Replacing the 1100 class. These ships are a big win for the Vancouver shipyard, but will take years to deliver given to volume of work that is needed now by the Coast Guard. Its unclear what the design of these vessels will be, though VARD has been commissioned to study this. the design is likely several years out.

the reference to the Midshore vessels is interesting, as that is a less well defined project, and there is no vessel count assigned to it. However the announcement also included the line

the Government of Canada intends to add a third Canadian shipyard as a partner under the NSS. The Government of Canada will move forward with a competitive process to select the third shipyard in the coming months.

Its unclear what work will be going to that yard, though the release does mention Coast Guard work and the midshore vessels are currently unassigned. these would be an odd fit, as there smaller size could be done by a smaller yard. Davie may end up with some of the sea span work. Though the release cites an open competition, it would be a huge shock if it wasen’t Davie.

AOPS Updates

Today marks 2 milestones in the AOPS Program. ISI rolled out the Bow Mega block around 4:30 Friday afternoon, where it will join the 2/3 of the the future HMCS Margaret Brooke which rolled out in September.

Also Friday morning, construction began on AOPS #4 – the future HMCS William Hall, with the first pieces being welded together.

It was also noticed that one of the Radars on HMCS Harry DeWolf was undergoing testing, and at least one generator on board the ship was operating.

Federal Announcement today at shipyard

The Federal minister of Defense is scheduled to make an announcement at the Halifax Shipyard today. That announcement will probably be an order for the 6th AOPS. the original contract was for up to 6 boats, with a firm commitment for 5 ships, with the 6th a possibility depending on budget and performance.  Sagin will likely announce a firm order for that 6th boat, or possibly a firm 6th, and a maybe 7th under similar terms.

Yesterday the feds announced the winners of Halifax Class repair contract. worth 7 billion dollars, over the remaining life of the ships, the work went to Victoria Shipyards for the 5 west coast frigates, and will be split between Irving Shipyard and Davie in Quebec.

The concern the Navy has is that as the ships age, two will need to be drydocked at once, and halifax shipyard only has one dry dock. Hence the need to split the work.

Haliax Shipyard did have a second drydock – however they sold it to International Ship Repair of Tampa Florida.