Category Archives: pier42

Lots of Small Ships, and ice

(Above)Unistar arrived first Friday from Belledune NB, and tied up at Pier 9 to take on bunkers. she sailed overnight Saturday. (below) the Bandura arrived with Casks of Radioactive material on deck. the ship arrived Friday afternoon, and sailed before sunset.

(below)Lomur arrived at Halterm for Eimskip. Sailing on the Green Line, the ship arrived from Argentia NF. and took a fair amount of freezing spray. A small ship, she is rated for 505TEU, and sailed for Portland Maine.

The ice was knocked off with the spreader, before the containers could be removed. The Photo above and video below were contributed by a friend of the site.

Port Expansion Options Revealed.

The Current Expansion project, now underway.

With the interm expansion of pier 42 currently underway, The Port announced its further expansion options yesterday. The Images are photos of slides taken by Councilor Waye Mason, who attended the presentation by the port, and the descriptions are mostly lifted directly from the ports website at portcityhfx.ca, with some additional comments by me.

Halterm North

This scenario involves infilling the main Ocean Terminal slips between Piers A, A1, and B, using a caisson wall that supports a new container pier, thus creating a single UCCV berth. The existing Pier C would continue to operate throughout the development phase.

This proposal would create an efficient container yard that can still accommodate dry bulk and cruise operations along the north side of Pier A. The Halterm North option can be built within the Port’s existing property, with negligible impact on navigation or on adjacent land use. This option requires the least amount of imported fill material and has the shortest development timeline of all three Halterm-based scenarios.

The Halifax Port Authority would investigate relocating users of Ocean Terminals to other locations within the Port of Halifax. This option would be the least expensive and easiest to build.

Halterm South

The Halterm South concept extends the existing Halterm berth southward with significant infilling to accommodate on-dock rail and container storage. The slip between Piers A1 and B would be infilled to create additional yard space.

Enhancement options for Point Pleasant Park were included as part of the Halterm South expansion concept. This option would be more expensive and would require more time to build than Halterm North.

Halterm East

Phase One would involve infilling the slip between Piers A and B and a new berth would be developed east of the existing Pier C. Should container volume continue to increase, the new berth would be expanded southward to increase the capacity in subsequent phases.
 
The Halifax Port Authority would investigate relocating users of Ocean Terminals to other locations within the Port of Halifax.This option would be more expensive and would require more time to build than Halterm North.

Dartmouth

The optimal location of a new Dartmouth container terminal was identified as being to the south of downtown Dartmouth and to the north of Eastern Passage. This location was determined by navigational issues and by land use developments along the Dartmouth shoreline. (this is essentially the imperial oil site)

For the Dartmouth concept, two rail options were considered to provide necessary rail access to the site:

  • Trains running along the existing Dartmouth waterfront line
  • Trains running along new track east of Dartmouth

Trains running along the existing Dartmouth waterfront were found to be impractical due to the 4200 meter length required for efficient operation. A route for a 20+ km track running east of Dartmouth was examined in detail and adjusted to mitigate property and environment impacts.

Not including rail costs and costs related to property purchases, capital cost for this option was estimated at $1.4 billion CAD in 2017, with operation not expected to start until early-to-middle 2030. This option was determined to have much higher costs, longer timeline, increased logistical/construction challenges, and significant impact on properties and residents in Dartmouth. the real costs for this will likely be north of 3 billion dollars.

Other Options

Barges
Assessed the use of barges to transship local containers between Halterm and Fairview Cove. This option would result in inconsistent movement of freight with increased exposure to weather-related delays and would add substantial operating costs to port-related goods movement

Halifax East/South Byway through Rock Cut
Extensively studied the option of moving both rail cargo and trucks safely through the rock cut. This option would require expanding the width of the rock cut to 83 feet, or 25 metres. Several portions of the rock cut would require significant alteration (excavation and blasting) in predominantly residential areas. It would also require the rebuilding of 13 bridges and one rail bridge, plus the costs associated with design, construction and land acquisition (which would include expropriation) for a new highway intersection in the North End.

Halifax Northwest Arm Crossing
Evaluated the diversion of local traffic to a new tunnel under the Northwest Arm, with connections to the west-side roads. This option would take too much time, would be cost-prohibitive, would pose significant engineering challenges to achieve the necessary 8% grade and would displace a large number of residents.

Raising the Harbour Bridges to expand Fairview Cove
Evaluated the reconstruction of the harbour bridges to increase the vertical clearance to accommodate ultra-class vessels.This option would result in significant traffic disruptions in Halifax over many years and would result in a significant timeline disadvantage when compared to other more viable concepts

McNabs Island
Assessed the option of building a new Greenfield terminal at McNabs Island.This option would take too much time, would be cost-prohibitive, would pose significant engineering challenges to develop the required cross-harbour connections for both road and rail lines, and does not have stakeholder support.

Dredging Underway

though it began last week, Tuesday marked the official start of dredging for the Halterm expansion. McNally appears to be using two dump scows, dumping the spoil at the reclamation area off Fairview Cove.

A loaded scow heads towards the basin

Halterm Expansion Underway

The expansion of Halterm is underway, with Ocean Construction removing the walkway from the existing pier. The new Caseons will butt up against the back, widening the pier, as well as extending it Seaward.

McNally construction appears to have won the dredging tender, as their tugs and scows have been arriving in town the past week.

Port of Halifax Commences Berth Extension

 

 

 

the Following release was issued by the port today:

The Board of Directors of the Halifax Port Authority and the CEO are pleased to confirm that the work on the temporary South End Container Terminal berth extension has commenced, implementing its August 2018 board decision and announced at Halifax Port Days.

 The berth extension will ensure that the Port of Halifax will continue to be a vital link in the Canadian supply chain, facilitate global economic ties and provide access to international markets for importers and exporters.

 Construction is anticipated to be complete in Q1 of 2020.

A tender was recently issued, closing Nov 2 for the Dredging of the expanded area.

File Photo from the previous pier expansion work.

Halterm Upgrades Yard Equipment

Halterm yesterday announced the purchase of new equipment.

The terminal will be spending 10Million Dollars over the next year to increase refer capacity by 25%, as well as purchasing 3 Kone Rubber Tire Gantries (or RTG). The 3 units are expected to be delivered in February (1) and October (2) of next year. The New RTG’s will straddle a container stack 5 high, and 6 wide.

The terminal also recently began scraping the 3 original container cranes. Small, and unused, they took up space at the end of the pier.

This continues a recent history of new equipment since the Installation of the New Super Post Panamax Cranes in 2014. Earlier this year the Terminal took delivery of new Kone Reachstackers

Kalmar Ottawa Yard tractors and Toplifts.

Fresh Paint

In an earlier post, i mentioned 2 cranes at Halterm didn’t appear to be in use.
the 2 Original Post Panamax Cranes at Halterm are rolled to the end of the pier so they can be painted.

they should look just as new as the new ones in a few weeks.

Crane Move on Weather Delay.

Looks like work is held up due to Rain.
Zhen Hua 19 has moved into Position at pier 42, however no work has been done to load the crane.

UPDATE: Apprently they couldnt get the pins out to remove the wheels. the crane will be re-located over land.



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