Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Em Ithaki - Fill in for ACL


The Container ship Em Ithaki tied up at Fairview Cove this morning. Built in 1991, she is owned and managed by Eurobulk of Greece, and came of a Long term charter as MOL Volta between 2001 and 2012. She is rated at 2135 TEU so is quite low in capacity.

She is likely just filling in for a few trips while the regular ACL Vessel is being Maintained.

Eurobulk LTD photo.

Friday, August 22, 2014

USCGC Escanaba Visits

The US Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba Arrived in Halifax this morning and tied up at the Navy dockyard.

typical of the USCG's Medium Endurance Cutters, she was last here in 2010.
See Previous USCG Visits Here

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Annual Stop for Bowdoin


The Bowdoin is the official Sailing ship of the State of Maine, and seems to make an annual stop in Halifax in August.
See posts from August  2013, 2012, 2011

More Windmill Parts passing through


HR Maria loaded with what appear to be wind turbine tower segments. She anchored earlier, having arrived from Port Said. She is on her way to Muskegon in Lake Michigan.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

NS Tenders for New Grand Passage Ferry

The Province of Nova Scotia Today issued a tender for the construction of a new 18 car Ferry to run on Grand passage, which is the run between Long island and Brier Island at the end of Digby Neck.

The Route is Currently served by the Joe Casey, Built by AF Theriault in 1995. the Digby neck is also severed by the 2003 Halifax shipyard built Petit Princess, which runs between the mainland and long island. (See those boats here)

Its unclear what the plan for the Joe Cassey is, however she will likely take the place of one of the older ferries in the Provincial highways fleet. its worth noting that the design calls for dual Voith Drives - like the Halifax Harbour ferries use, and unlike the Z drive arrangement used on the current boats.

you can grab the tender documents, Which include a full drawing set at:http://novascotia.ca/tenders/tenders/tender-details.aspx?id=60146868

Friday, August 15, 2014

Group Ocean Moves East - Building Floating Dry dock in Bas-Caraquet

 
The New Brunswick government, the New Brunswick Naval Centre, and Group Océan  have signed an agreement aimed at reviving the shipbuilding and repair sector in Bas-Caraquet, which will generate up create up to 77 jobs and stimulate other economic spinoffs.
"Reviving shipbuilding in northern New Brunswick is important for job creation and supporting our provincial economy," said Premier David Alward. "The arrival of Océan opens the door for shipbuilding and repair work to resume in northeast New Brunswick."
The  tripartite agreement stipulates that Océan will establish its operations at the Naval Center of New Brunswick through a long-term lease. In the coming months, Océan will begin the first phase of the construction of a floating dry dock with a capacity of nearly 7,000 tons.

The dry dock will be constructed in three sections to reach a total length of 105 metres (350 ft.).
This large-scale equipment, which complements Océan's current inventory, will bolster the range of services the company offers to customers. The dry dock will also meet the needs of Océan for the repair of its largest vessels. The creation of 57 to 77 jobs over a five-year period is planned under the agreement.

For Comparison, the ScotiaDock 2 was 150m, and the Novadock is 250m. this looks to be poised to bid on non NSPS government business (new naval tugs, etc) and compete for smaller repair jobs with Shelburne ship repair.

File photo above Dredge Ocean Traverse Nord taking in supplies before heading to do contract in the carribean. the Dredge was built at Ocean's yard in Quebec.

The Panama Canal is 100 today.



100 years ago today, the SS Ancon was the first vessel to transit the canal. The panama canal was started by the french, who were emboldened by their success building the Suez canal. Panama was very different, and they ran out of money long before they finished digging. The Americans bought the whole operation for pennies on the dollar, adjusted their plans, killed mosquitos, and 100 years ago today succeeded.


David McCullough offers an excellent history of the canal in his book the Path Between The Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 - its arranged in 3 parts - the french attempt, the American attempt, and the political dealings in between. Its a good read, and i highly recomend it.