New Navy Tugs – Charter?

The Navy went looking to Purchase 4 new Large tugs to replace the Glen and Fire Class Boats in 2012. That procurement hasn’t gone anywhere, and the government is now looking at the price and availability  to charter tugs for 5 years, with options on renewal for up to 20 additional years. They are looking at four tugs; Two for the East Coast; and Two for the West Coast.

The Stated requirements are:

•Twin engine/propulsion plant capable of delivering an approximate bollard pull of  40 tons or an equivalent total power of 4,000 BHP;
•Firefighting capability (FiFi 1);
•Full speed of at least 12 knots (fully loaded);
•Draft not to exceed 6 meters;
•Vessels not to exceed 5 years of age at the start of the contract.
•Preferred length overall not to exceed 33 metres;
•The vessels will be operated by a civilian crew holding Transport Canada certification;
•The tugs must have a Transport Canada Certificate of Registration;
•The vessels must meet regulatory requirements to operate in Canada and be in full compliance with the Canada Shipping Act; and
•Daily in harbour operations consisting of hot or cold moves of existing and future warships up to 25,000 tons displacement;
•Assisting in closing harbour gates, delivering supplies or fresh water, buoy operations and other routine harbour tasks

Interestingly, they are looking at both Bareboat Charter, or as a Time Charter. In a bareboat charter, the Navy would crew the vessels and only pay for using the Hardware (Much like leasing a car) the other option would be to provide a fully crewed tug, available on 15 min notice for an hourly rate. this is very much the arrangement commercial shippers use when they pay for tug services. The difference is that the tugs would be dedicated to navy use


HANZE GOTEBORG for bunkers

The loaded bulker HANZE GOTEBORG arrived very early this morning. She sailed this afternoon around 2:30, giving no destination. Dutch registered, she was also built in the Netherlands in 2013.

Her recent sailing is somewhat odd. She spent 7 days in Tuxpan Mexico, then took 16 days to sail to Savannah. She spent 2 days there before sailing for St John’s NFLD. She spent 13 hours there, then sailed for Halifax, Took Bunkers and sailed.

Update: I have been told (in a comment below) that she stopped in St. John’s, NL due to contaminated fuel.  Once she offloaded it and made repairs, the crew realized they did not have enough fuel to continue the trip.  They had to revert to Halifax to refuel before continuing trip across to Europe.

Leeway Odyssey – reincarnated.

The Leeway Odyssey arrived this morning and tied up at the Museum Wharves. She is the reincarnation of the CCGS Louis M. Lauzier.

Leeway Odyssey was built in 1976 by Breton Industry Ltd.of Port Hawkesbury as  Fisheries patrol vessel Cape Harrison. In 1983, she was converted to a survey vessel and renamed CCGS Louis M. Lauzier. She was finally laid up in 1995. In 1998 she was chartered to MUN, until 2005, when she was converted back to a Patrol Vessel in Burlington Ontario, to be crewed by the RCMP and CCGS. After the Conversion, she was assigned to the Quebec region. to patrol the St Lawrence. With the New Hero Class coming into service, she was declared surplus, and Renamed 2014-03.

(below) Hastily applied lettering of her new name,  her former 2014-03 name can be seen through the red. (note the freshly painted out CG markings in the photo above)

She was Registered under her current name in Halifax as of Oct 30/2015 to LEEWAY YACHTS LTD.

 (below) A stop in Halifax in 2011. Note the Stern Ramp for the RHIB.