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Herma P, going back

Herma P made a second appearance today at Fairview Cove. She is the ex Maersk Dryden, and looking sharp after a yard period after that charter ended. Her and her sisters are now appearing on Hapag Llyod services, likely on short term charters, while they cycle their fleet.

She was first in halifax at the end of march, and is now on the return trip.

Hapag LLyod has recently merged with CSAV, and is sending older and smaller ships to the scrappers, or selling them to other carriers.

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Maersk Palermo at pier 26

Nothing says problem like an odd choice of pier and position. Maersk Palermo spent her usual saturday stop at pier 36, bow first. Maersk Palermo usually stops at pier 41, and on saturday that pier was taken by the Tiny Sina for Melfi. Also Maersk Palermo was bow first,Vessels at pier 36 tend to back in stern first, finally she appears to be balasted down in the bow.

Maresk Sails from montreal to Rotterdam via halifax, so its possible she took some ice damage in the river.

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Bunker Spill In Vancouver Harbour.

A Bulker anchored in English Bay in Vancouver spilled several tons of Bunker fuel into the harbour yesterday, Most of the oil has now been collected, it has however reached land in several places.

This incident has angered environmentalists, who are now citing this as an example of why tankers in northern BC waters are a dangerous idea. While this leak, is the equivalent of a leaky fuel tank in your car, it appears that the spill was reported 9 hours before a response was mobilized.

The real issue in this case is not that fuel spilled (though this is unusual, needs to be investigated, and the crew charged if they did something illegal) but that the response took 9 hours. If the response was quicker, and oil booms setup, in all likely hood the slick would have remained around the ship and not reached shore.

Could it happen here? sure. In fact it has. HMCS Preserver left a valve open in 2011 and spilled several tons of fuel by Imperial Oil. Quick action contained the spill, and we only found out about it via the media.

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JRCC reports CCGS Ann Harvey Taking on Water

the Halifax Joint Rescue Coordination Center has advised that 2 cormorant Helicopters and 2 vessels have been dispatched to the Coast Guard Ice breaker Ann Harvey, who is reportedly taking on water. Ann Harvey was breaking ice tending buoys off Burgeo NL at the time of the incident.

She spent a week in Halifax In march.

There are 28 persons aboard, 26 crew, along with 2 cadets, and no one has been injured.
reports are the Ingress is due to the vessel striking bottom. The Burgeo Lifeboat CCGS WG George is on scene assisting and has a tow line attached to the Ann Harvey. The Louis St Laurent is 10-12 hours away, and will be released by the CCGS Teleost on her arrival, expected Thursday afternoon.

UPDATE 02/04/15 1000: She has lost propulsion, as Motor Room is flooded. Ann Harvey is powered by 3 diesels, which drive generators. The 2 fixed pitch propellers are driven by electric motors, which are located in the flooded compartment.

the 2 cadets, and 2 non essential crew members have been evacuated from the ship. DND has sent a team of Navy divers to Newfoundland to survey the vessel, and HMCS Charlottetown also departed Halifax Wednesday to provide support.

Louis Ste Laurent was due around midnight, and was planning to tow the Ann Harvey to safe anchorage in Connoire Bay. 

Update 1200: DFO Photo of Ann harvey at anchor

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Former halifax tour boat Liana’s Ransom in trouble, crew rescued


Coast Guard search and rescue crews from Station Gloucester, Air Station Cape Cod and the Coast Guard Cutter Ocracoke rescued nine crewmembers from the Canadian tall ship Liana’s Ransom 58 miles east of Gloucester, Monday. 
Watchstanders at the Sector Boston Command Center received notification at 12:35 a.m. that the vessel’s engines were disabled and its sails were wrapped around the mast.  
As the weather deteriorated, and seas reached nearly 10 feet, Sector Boston launched two 47-foot motor lifeboat crews from Station Gloucester to tow the vessel back to Gloucester. Once on scene, the boat crews connected the tow, but the rough sea conditions caused the tow line to break. 
The motor lifeboats crews directed the crew of Liana’s Ransom to don immersion suits and to prepare to abandon ship about 30 miles east of Gloucester and a Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk Helicopter from Air Station Cape Cod was diverted to assist. 
The nine passengers were transferred from Liana’s Ransom to the Coast Guard motor lifeboats. One man suffered a head injury when leaping from Liana’s Ransom and was airlifted to Massachusetts General Hospital by the Jayhawk helicopter crew.
The Station Gloucester crews returned to the station with the eight remaining crewmembers. A locator beacon was left on Liana’s Ransom for tracking and the Coast Guard Cutter Ocracoke is en-route to evaluate towing the vessel to port. 
“It was fortunate for the crew of the vessel that the owner reached out to us,” said Jay Woodhead, the command duty officer at Sector Boston’s Command Center. He said with winds gusting to 30 knots, it was unsafe for them to stay aboard.
Liana’s Ransom has had a rough few months. In December, she was demasted off cape sable island while attempting to sail to St. Kitts. She is also rumored to have grounded in the sand in Eastern Passage during her last visit to Halifax.
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AC624 – Normal vs Not Normal.

By now, we have all seen and heard the stories about the landing of AC624, A Toronto to Halifax flight with a A320 Aircraft. This route and aircraft land in Halifax dozens of times per week. Saturday night, this one came up short.

Runway 05/23 is the main runway at YHZ. runway 05 is a quick landing, as after you exit the runway, you end up at the terminal. this runway was extended in 2012, and may have reduced the impact of this crash.

The MK airlines crash, the Same ILS Antenna was taken out, however then it was on a berm. the space between the berm and the end of the runway was filled in as part of the Extension.
note the Alignment of Runway 05 and taxiway J in 2007:

And now, on the Current Chart.

(Below) the aircraft sits on the runway. the ILS Localizer lays broken on the left at the end of the runway.

Compare that with the normal Approach below. Note the plane is also an Air Canada A320. Also note that windsock above.

Here is the touchdown. Rear wheels are down, and the nose is coming down. Note the windsock. AC624 came to rest right where it should have touched down.

How Low was the plane? Here is the crater it left in the snow, and on the left the remains of the ILS Localizer. also note the snapped off lead light in the foreground. thats an 8 foot fence.

These are the leading lights in advance of the broken one. Note the height difference.  This flight was luckey. The aircraft clipped powerlines, but somehow managed to miss the wooden telephone poles. also the large dent in the snow probably cushioned the impact, as the recent snowfalls were still relatively fluffy compared to the earth mound.

Below an AC flight landing. this is landing on runway 23. Note the clearance over the localizer

Parts of the Landing Gear lie among parts of the localizer, and the right side of the runway.

Thanks to ADS-B, You can watch a replay of the flight Here

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